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Is there a simple way of combining XSLT's. I am new to XSLT, and i getting the hang of how to create them and the funny ways of using them to get my desired outcome. However at the moment I am able to use one XSLT to convert my output into the desired output; BUT then straight after it i have another, and another. Each XSLT changes the output from one thing to another.

For example, and these are simple XSLTs to illustrate the issue:

XSLT 1:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    xmlns:r="http://www.castiron.com/response" exclude-result-prefixes="r">

    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="/root">
        <xsl:element name="imageScene7Response"  xmlns="http://www.castiron.com/burberry/digitalcatalogue/response">
            <xsl:element name="rcode">0</xsl:element>
            <xsl:element name="rmessage">success</xsl:element>
            <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="payload"/>
        </xsl:element>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="/root/payload">
        <xsl:if test="not(productId = preceding-sibling::payload/productId)">

            <xsl:element name="payload" xmlns="http://www.castiron.com/burberry/digitalcatalogue/response">
                <xsl:element name="productId">
                    <xsl:value-of select="productId"/>
                </xsl:element>
                <xsl:for-each select="../payload[productId = current()/productId]">
                    <xsl:choose>
                        <xsl:when test="type = '0' and preceding-sibling::payload/type = type and productId = preceding-sibling::payload/productId">
                            <xsl:element name="alternativeImages">
                                <xsl:value-of select="url"/>
                            </xsl:element>
                        </xsl:when>
                        <xsl:when test="type = '0'">
                            <xsl:element name="mainImage">
                                <xsl:value-of select="url"/>
                            </xsl:element>
                        </xsl:when>
                        <xsl:when test="type &gt; '0' and type &lt; '70'">
                            <xsl:element name="alternativeImages">
                                <xsl:value-of select="url"/>
                            </xsl:element>
                        </xsl:when>
                        <xsl:when test="type = '70'">
                            <xsl:element name="video">
                                <xsl:value-of select="url"/>
                            </xsl:element>
                        </xsl:when>
                        <xsl:when test="type = '80'">
                            <xsl:element name="lookbookImages">
                                <xsl:value-of select="url"/>
                            </xsl:element>
                        </xsl:when>
                        <xsl:when test="type = 'sw'">
                            <xsl:element name="swatchImages">
                                <xsl:value-of select="url"/>
                            </xsl:element>
                        </xsl:when>
                    </xsl:choose>
                </xsl:for-each>
            </xsl:element>
        </xsl:if>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Then:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match=
        "*[not(@*|*|comment()|processing-instruction()) 
        and normalize-space()=''
        ]"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Then some other logic in other XSLT.

Is it as easy as putting the templates one below another in a single combined XSLT?

XML SNIPT

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<root>
    <payload>
        <productId>11111</productId>
        <type>0</type>
        <url>https://11111</url>
    </payload>
    <payload>
        <productId>11111</productId>
        <type>1</type>
        <url>https://11111</url>
    </payload>
    <payload>
        <productId>11111</productId>
        <type>1</type>
        <url></url>
    </payload>
    <payload>
        <productId>22222</productId>
        <type>0</type>
        <url>https://22222</url>
    </payload>
    <payload>
        <productId>22222</productId>
        <type>1</type>
        <url>https://22222</url>
    </payload>
    <payload>
        <productId>22222</productId>
        <type>sw</type>
        <url>https://22222</url>
    </payload>
    <payload>
        <productId>22222</productId>
        <type>sw</type>
        <url></url>
    </payload>
</root>

This isnt the best example, but it will work!

share|improve this question
    
Please, edit the question and provide the source XML document. The first transformation can be improved. Also it seems possible to even eleiminate the need for the second transformation. As for general ways of combining different transformations, using <xsl:import> is your friend. Do have a look at the FXSL library which contains over 150 stylesheet modules many of which import others. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 9 '12 at 14:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer is: It depends

If you have multiple XSL Templates then it is possible that it was intended for them to be applied sequentially to the XML - so, for example, if you have 3 XSLT's, it could be that the first is applied to the original document, the second to the result of the first transformation, and the third to the result of the second transformation.

This is known as the pipeline approach - the XML flows along an XSLT pipeline, being repeatedly transformed until a result comes out of the other end and is a perfectly valid approach.

If the XSLT's were designed to be applied sequentially, then it is best to leave them that way - mixing them together into a giant XSLT is possible, but can be very tricky to manipulate and maintain as you have to pass XML node sets from template to template. This approach is discussed here, although I disagree with the author's conclusion that this a purer approach.

In the example above, you have 2 clear XSLT's. The first is clearly structural - it's designed to transform the structure of the XML response into another XML document. The second XSLT you have is almost a utility XSLT - it appears to be designed to strip out anything that isn't an attribute or attribute. In this instance, it would probably be best to apply them in order to the XML response message.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect thank you is was this bit i was looking for If you have multiple XSL Templates then it is possible that it was intended for them to be applied sequentially to the XML - so, for example, if you have 3 XSLT's, it could be that the first is applied to the original document, the second to the result of the first transformation, and the third to the result of the second transformation. This is known as the pipeline approach - the XML flows along an XSLT pipeline, being repeatedly transformed until a result comes out of the other end and is a perfectly valid approach. –  MMKD Sep 9 '12 at 13:48
    
So it is best is you want to manipulate the XML of number a times to use a number of different XSLTs. Thanks! –  MMKD Sep 9 '12 at 13:48
    
Yes that's it! You can also keep your XSLT's smaller too - it can be a nightmare to manage huge XSLT files. Out of interest, what language/XML parser are you using? In .Net you use an XSLTransform class to transform an XML to get a new XMLDocument back. You then apply a new XSLTransform class to that XML to get a second transformed XML document back, and so on and so forth. –  dash Sep 9 '12 at 13:50
    
This is where it gets interesting...i use an ETL tool from IBM called Cast Iron. And I am very limited with what i can do, all i can do is apply an XSLT so i simply copy in the stylesheet and point the xml at it for it convert. –  MMKD Sep 9 '12 at 14:33
    
OK another quick question....how can i combine the two stylesheets above. I want to remove all empty tags. –  MMKD Sep 9 '12 at 14:34

It may be possible to improve the first transformation so that the second one could even be eliminated.

I would be glad to update this answer once the OP edits the question and provides a source XML document.

As for general ways of combining different transformations:

Using <xsl:import> is your friend.

Do have a look at the FXSL library which contains over 150 stylesheet modules many of which import others.

Rule of thumb:

Whenever a template or group of templates contained in the same stylesheet module, contains useful functionality that may be used in more than one cases, it is a good practice to write these in such way that it would be possible and convenient to import them by other, more specific stylesheet modules, that need this functionality and thus avoid re-implementing this functionality in every differen specific case.

share|improve this answer

In XSLT 1.0 and 2.0, there are two native instructions for combining style-sheets: xsl:import and xsl:include. In XSLT 3.0, there is a third mechanism, which I will get to later.

The import instruction looks like this ...

<xsl:import href="my-other-transform.xsl" />

And the include instruction is similiar

<xsl:include href="my-other-transform.xsl" />

xsl:import references the other style-sheet and makes it's templates available, but at a lower priority than the templates of the main style-sheet. xsl:include acts as if the instruction was replaced by a verbatim copy of the included style-sheet.

In general, the preferred technique to make a top-level style-sheet which is very specific to the problem you are trying to solve, and import style-sheets, where the imported style-sheets are more generalised and general-purpose.

If you are using XSLT 1.0 on the client side, I don't know, but I suspect that browser support for xsl:import and xsl:include will be limited. If you are using XSLT 1.0 server-side, then shame on you! You have no reason not to upgrade to XSLT 2.0 .

In XSLT 3.0, you can use the xsl:package instruction to declare a self-contained collection of modules with fine-grain control of visiblity of the API points.

share|improve this answer
    
Sean, Please, be cautious when recommending XSLT 3.0 features. XSLT 3.0 is still a working draft (WD) and many features could change from their current definition (even disappear altogether). AFAIK none of the existing current XSLT 3.0 implementations supports packages, yet. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 9 '12 at 15:05

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