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As you can tell I'm new to multithreading and a bit stuck here. For my program I need a thread (PchangeThread in the below example) that can be toggled on and off from another thread at any point during execution of the program. The thread should be suspended on start and resume when pixelDetectorOn() is called.

The two threads will most likely not need to share any data except for a start/stop flag. I included a reference to the main thread anyway, just in case.

However, in the below code the only message that is ever output is "before entering loop", which indicates that the thread never wakes up from wait() for some reason. I'm guessing this is some kind of locking problem but I haven't been able to figure out what exactly is going wrong. Locking on this.detector from the main thread gives me the same result. Also I'm wondering if the wait()/notify() paradigm is really the way to go for suspending and waking the thread.

public class PchangeThread extends Thread {
  Automation _automation;
  private volatile boolean threadInterrupted;

  PchangeThread(Automation automation)
  {
    this._automation = automation;
    this.threadInterrupted = true;
  }

  @Override
  public void run()
  {
    while (true) {
      synchronized (this) {
        System.out.println("before entering loop");
        while (threadInterrupted == true) {
          try {
            wait();
            System.out.println("after wait");
          } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
            System.out.println("thread2: caught interrupt!");
          }
        }
      }
      process();
    }
  }

  private void process()
  {
    System.out.println("thread is running!");

  }

  public boolean isThreadInterrupted()
  {
    return threadInterrupted;
  }

  public synchronized void resumeThread()
  {
    this.threadInterrupted = false;
    notify();
  }
}

resumeThread() is called from the main thread the following way:

public synchronized void pixelDetectorOn(Context stateInformation) {        
        this.detector.resumeThread();
}

detector is a reference to an instance of PchangeThread. The "detector"-thread is instantiated in the program's main module the following way:

detector=new PchangeThread(this);
share|improve this question

migrated from codereview.stackexchange.com Sep 9 '12 at 13:58

This question came from our site for peer programmer code reviews.

    
This site is for getting reviews of working code. This kind of question is better asked on SO. Migrating there now. – sepp2k Sep 9 '12 at 13:58
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As you said, you need to protect access to the shared flag. You declared threadInterrupted volatile, but than are still using syncronized. You only need one. I prefer to just use syncronized as it makes things simpler. Multi-threading is complicated enough, keep it simple unless you know you need more complicated controls. This means that any time threadInterrupted is read or written to, the access should be synchronized. Currently, you are not doing that in setThreadInterrupt() and isThreadInterrupted().

Secondly, you want to synchronize on as small of a code block as possible. Inside of run(), you are synchronizing over the inner loop. In actuality, you only need to to synchronize on the read of threadInterrupted. When the implementation of isThreadInterrupted() is fixed as mentioned above, you can use that directly and remove the synchronized block from the inner loop.

The fact that you are synchronizing on the inner loop, is the error that is causing your code to never print "thread is running!". PchangeThread acquires the lock on itself and calls wait() to suspend the thread. However, the thread is still holding the lock at this point. At some point later, the main thread calls resumeThread() in order to restart the thread. However, that method can not begin its execution because it must first wait to acquire the lock. However, it will never get the lock until the PchangeThread is notified.

You are providing two ways to set threadInterrupted, but only one of them notifies the thread when the value is set to false. Do you really need setThreadInterrupt()? I expect you don't. If you keep it, it should act the same as resumeThread() when the argument is false.

Lastly, it is better to lock on a private object instead of the instance itself. You have complete control over the private lock object. However, anyone with a reference to your thread instance could also use it as the lock for a synchronized block, which could potentially lead to a hard to find deadlock.

Your code altered to use my edits:

public class PchangeThread extends Thread {
  private final Object _lock = new Object();
  Automation _automation;
  private final boolean _threadInterrupted;

  PchangeThread(Automation automation)
  {
    _automation = automation;
    _threadInterrupted = true;
  }

  @Override
  public void run()
  {
    while (true) {
      System.out.println("before entering loop");
      while (isThreadInterrupted()) {
        try {
          wait();
          System.out.println("after wait");
        } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
          System.out.println("thread2: caught interrupt!");
        }
      }
      process();
    }
  }

  private void process()
  {
    System.out.println("thread is running!");

  }

  public boolean isThreadInterrupted()
  {
    synchronized (_lock) {
      return _threadInterrupted;
    }
  }

  public void resumeThread()
  {
    synchronized (_lock) {
      _threadInterrupted = false;
      notify();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think for this case using synchronized is a bit of an overkill. An AtomicBoolean which utilizes CAS operations will be more efficient. – LordDoskias Sep 9 '12 at 14:05
    
@LordDoskias: In this case, AtomicBoolean would suffice. However, the OP is a beginner and does not understand how to properly use synchronized. I think it is better to fully understand the basics before looking at special cases. If tomorrow the code needed two variables to be updated without interruption, the code would have to be completely rewritten. We also don't know how efficient the code needs to be. Acquiring a lock is more expensive, but if there is disk IO or user interaction, it might not make a significant difference. – unholysampler Sep 9 '12 at 15:18
    
Thanks for your answers! There's two things here which I don't quite understand though: Doesn't wait() need to be called from a synchronized context and then relinquishes the lock by itself once it is run? I'm getting an "illegal monitor state exception". Also, wouldn't notify() have to be called from the lock object ( _lock.notify())? I am mainly doing this as a (hopefully useful) programming practice, so I think I'm going to try out the other methods as well. In the end I will probably stick with CAS operations, since this thread will have to do some very CPU-intensive calculations. – Dominik Hensler Sep 9 '12 at 16:45
    
@DominikHensler: I did some more reading on wait()/notify() and your usage of it was correct. I tried running your code with a simple main method that creates and instance, starts it, sleeps, then calls resumeThread(). This executed as expected. Are you sure resumeThread() is being called correctly in your main thread? The excerpt you posted is a synchronized method, it's possible that your issue is with the calling of that method. – unholysampler Sep 9 '12 at 17:29
    
I call the method from the main thread with "this.detector.resumeThread();". I tried removing the synchronization from the caller (which should be safe), but it's still the same. Whenever I call any method of PchangeThread from the main thread, with or without synchronization, I get the following effects: 1.) The called method is not executed 2.) All of the remaining statements within the calling method aren't executed either. 3.) Once execution has reached the end of the caller, the main thread continues normally. The netbeans debugger does not show a deadlock – Dominik Hensler Sep 9 '12 at 22:28

I personally would ask myself the following question in this case: Is the

isInterrupted

flag set only by the main thread e.g. the worker thread just reads it and decides whether to wait or not based on the flag BUT doesn't update it. Or can it be set by both the main thread and the worker thread.

If it is the former - go for a volatile boolean. That way the worker thread will not cache the volatile's value and will always read it from memory. This won't create a race condition because only 1 thread will be updating it - the main one. Think of it as a publish/subscribe scenario.

If you scenario falls in the latter category - use an AtomicBoolean variable. Both cases are going to be more efficient than the synchronized keyword, since you won't acquire any locks but in the case of Atomic* variables you will be utilizing CAS operations which are more lightweight than lock acquisition.

share|improve this answer

Your code is not wrong (though is not ideal). I ran it and it prints all the expected messages. Likely, you just do not invoke resumeThread().

A couple of advises:

  • do not sync on Thread, make a Runnable and sync on it.

  • you want to start some computation, but what are the data to compute? Looks like they go in a separate way. This is a ground for errors. Use single channel for both data and control. The preferred way is to use a Queue for such a channel. For example, LinkedBlockingQueue is already synchronized in a proper way.

share|improve this answer
    
I do invoke resumeThread(), I've stepped through the program. The method is just not executed for some reason. Execution just skips to the end of the caller once resumeThread() is reached. What advantage would synchronizing on a runnable have (other than that I could inherit from another class?). The worker thread will have to compare pixel patterns in (near) realtime, so passing anything to it is probably not an option. I noticed something else though: a third party jar that I'm using spawns several threads. I can't see why, but maybe those are causing problems. – Dominik Hensler Sep 11 '12 at 0:31
1  
what IDE do you use? Try another IDE, and try javac from JDK from command line. – Alexei Kaigorodov Sep 11 '12 at 4:09

I doubt that anyone will read this, but just in case someone's interested in knowing:

When I checked the debugger log I noticed something strange - it read "debugging stopped on uncompilable source code: )Void;". Since I couldn't think of anything in my source that could have caused this error , I guessed that Netbeans had a problem with some part of the external code I was using (it was not caused by a breakpoint and the project compiled fine!). So, I just updated the third party library I'm using to it's latest version. And behold: after that I suddenly got a null pointer exception when I called resumeThread()!. I checked the rest of my code and quickly found the bug (indeed the reference to the thread was null).

So, to sum it up: The strange behaviour was caused by a minor bug in my program, but something in the external jar led to the suppression of the exception that should have been thrown. Just out of curiosity I double checked by downgrading the jar and "unfixing" the bug and again, the exception was swallowed and the debugger exited with the above mentioned strange message.

Netbeans version 7.1.1

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