Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two condition variables:

CondVar1
CondVar2

Used in two threads like this (pseudo-code):

// thread1 starts in 'waiting' mode, and then Thread2 signals
void Thread1()
{
    CondVar1->Wait();
    CondVar2->Signal();
}

void Thread2()
{
    CondVar1->Signal();
    CondVar2->Wait();
}

Can this cause a deadlock? meaning, thread1 waits, thread2 signals, and then can thread1 signals before thread2 enters Wait(), meaning thread2 will never return?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
The reverse is also possible: If thread 2 runs before thread 1, the signal on ConVar1 could be lost before thread 1 calls Wait. –  Tudor Sep 9 '12 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

You don't usually just wait on a condition variable. The common use pattern is holding a lock, checking a variable that determines whether you can proceed or not and if you cannot wait in the condition:

// pseudocode
void push( T data ) {
   Guard<Mutex> lock( m_mutex );   // Hold a lock on the queue
   while (m_queue.full())     // [1]
      m_cond1.wait(lock);         // Wait until a consumer leaves a slot for me to write
   // insert data
   m_cond2.signal_one();      // Signal consumers that might be waiting on an empty queue
}

Some things to note: most libraries allow for spurious wakes in condition variables. While it is possible to implement a condition variable that avoid spurious wakes, the cost of the operations would be higher, so it is considered a lesser evil to require users to recheck the state before continuing (while loop in [1]).

Some libraries, notably C++11, allow you to pass a predicate, and will implement the loop internally: cond.wait(lock, [&queue](){ return !queue.full(); } );

share|improve this answer

There are two situations that could lead to a deadlock here:

  1. In normal execution, the one you described. It is possible that the variable is signaled before the thread reaches the call to Wait, so the signal is lost.
  2. A spurious wake-up could happen, causing the first thread to leave the call to Wait before actually being signaled, hence signaling Thread 2 who is not yet waiting.

You should design your code as follows when using signaling mechanisms:

bool thread1Waits = true;
bool thread2Waits = true;

void Thread1()
{
    while(thread1Waits) CondVar1->Wait();
    thread2Waits = false; 
    CondVar2->Signal();
}

void Thread2()
{
    thread1Waits = false;
    CondVar1->Signal();
    while(thread2Waits) CondVar2->Wait();
}

Of course, this assumes there are locks protecting the condition variables and that additionally thread 1 runs before thread 2.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.