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I have the weirdest memory leak and I have no idea why. I have an abstract class as follows:

class ClassA
{
public:
    virtual ~ ClassA (){}
    virtual void notify(ClassB*) = 0;
    virtual void add(ClassB*) = 0;
}; 

class ClassC : public ClassA
{
public:
    void notify(ClassB*)
    { 
        //some cout statements
    }
    void add(ClassB*)
    { 
        //some cout statements
    }
};

int main()
{
    ClassA *f = new ClassC();
    delete f;
}

Now when I compile the code and run Valgrind, it get no leaks. However, when I remove the ClassA destructor (or make it non-virtual), Valgrind reports 32 bytes as definitely lost memory. I have no idea why this happens, since my destructor is doing nothing and there are no member variables. Any ideas?

EDIT: I've compiled in Ubuntu 64bit with g++

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Is new ClassB correct? Perhaps new ClassC? –  Vlad Sep 9 '12 at 15:13
    
Can you add which compiler and system –  PiotrNycz Sep 9 '12 at 17:10

2 Answers 2

Yes, undefined behavior can result in a memory leak, and that's what happens when you remove the virtual destructor.

C++03 5.3.5)

3) [...] In the first alternative (delete object ), if the static type of the operand is different from its dynamic type, the static type shall be a base class of the operand’s dynamic type and the static type shall have a virtual destructor or the behavior is undefined. [...]

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It is indeed UB as other answer stated.

I believed those 32 bytes lost are from ClassC hidden pointer(s) to vtable.

Compare sizeof for ClassA and ClassC in your example...

Classes with virtual stuff are usually bigger than sum of its members....

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Both classes have a pointer to a virtual table, as both have virtual functions. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 9 '12 at 16:03
    
@LuchianGrigore one of them is abstract. Maybe this could cause difference. It is very compiler dependent. –  PiotrNycz Sep 9 '12 at 17:09
    
I don't see how one being abstract is relevant. Both have a pointer to a virtual table. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 9 '12 at 17:12
    
Probably you are right. I just hope that OP will check and comment. –  PiotrNycz Sep 9 '12 at 17:29
    
Probably you are right. I just hope that OP will check and comment. –  PiotrNycz Sep 9 '12 at 17:32

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