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I have custom binary tree class that holds values of template type T (it could be value or pointer). Each value is encapsulated with number (this number is used for searching in tree). I want to have an std::map inside my tree class fo fast O(1) access to objects without numbers.

template <typename T>
stuct BSTNode 
{
  T value;
  int searchValue;
}

template <typename T>
class BST 
{
  BSTNode<T> * root;
  std::map<T, BSTNode<T>> cache;
  //... etc.
}

Example: I have class instance a inserted in tree under value n. Now I want to get the node associated with this a. I cannot search the tree, because I don't have n. So I want to use a, and from std::map get node = map[a]. Now I can do node->n.

How can I achieve this? I can override compare method of std::map:

bool operator()(const void * s1, const void * s2) const

But it doesn't work for value and pointer at the same time: cannot convert parameter 1 from const double to const void *.

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4  
std::map provides O(log N) access, not O(1). –  interjay Sep 9 '12 at 16:59
    
I know that... I can also use other implementation. And its still faster than iterate whole BST and comapre every node in O(N) –  Martin Perry Sep 9 '12 at 17:10
    
What is the type of a? You just say it's a "class instance". If it's an instance of T then why do you need to override anything? Either T can be compared (in which case the map will work), or else it can't (in which case what you're doing isn't possible - your template must either require that T is comparable, or take a comparator like map does and pass that comparator on to its map data member). –  Steve Jessop Sep 9 '12 at 17:22
    
Example: T is int... no problem at all, just compare values. If T is MyClass *, than I want to compare pointers address, not actual content of class. So overloading operator in MyClass will not work for my purposes. –  Martin Perry Sep 9 '12 at 17:27
    
@Martin Perry: std::map uses std::less as its default comparator. std::less<MyClass*> does compare addresses, not the objects pointed to. So it does do what you want. –  Steve Jessop Sep 9 '12 at 21:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make a traited comparator:

template <typename T>
struct NodeComp
{
    bool operator<(T const & lhs, T const & rhs) const
    {
        return lhs < rhs;
    }
};

template <typename U>
struct NodeComp<U *>
{
    bool operator<(U * lhs, U * rhs) const
    {
        return *lhs < *rhs;
    }
};

Now your map can be defined like so:

template <typename T>
class BST 
{
    BSTNode<T> * root;
    std::map<T, BSTNode<T>, NodeComp<T>> cache;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It wont work... comparator is written on BSTNode<T>, while key is just T... or am I mistaken ? –  Martin Perry Sep 9 '12 at 17:13
    
@MartinPerry: You're right! I changed it. –  Kerrek SB Sep 9 '12 at 17:30

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