Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am testing if a variable is greater than another variable. The if evaluation is getting the same value no matter what the values are.

COMP(){
avg=$(for avg in $(for file in $(ls /var/log/sa/sa[0123]*); do echo $file; done); do sar -r -f $avg| tail -1; done | awk '{totavg+=$4} END {print (totavg/NR)*5}');
for comp in $(sar -r -f /var/log/sa/sa08 | egrep -v "^$|Average|CPU|used" | awk '{print $5}'); do
        if [ `echo $avg` <  `echo $comp` ];
                then echo 'You have had a spike!';
                echo "COMP = $comp";
                echo "AVG = $avg";
        fi;
done }

I am getting this output even though the values are not really evaluating to true.

You have had a spike!
COMP = 41.20
AVG = 145.438
You have had a spike!
COMP = 41.20
AVG = 145.438
You have had a spike!
COMP = 41.19
AVG = 145.438
You have had a spike!  
COMP = 41.24 
AVG = 145.438

I have tried this multiple ways but can not get it working. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
for avg in $(for file in $(ls /var/log/sa/sa[0123]*); do echo $file; done); do ... is this a joke?? You mean for avg in /var/log/sa/sa[0123]*; do, don't you? –  tripleee Sep 9 '12 at 18:52
    
This would have fit better on codereview. There are so many things to change... –  l0b0 Sep 11 '12 at 11:30
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

yep as ingnacio has pointed out

average=`echo $avg`;
comp1=`echo $comp`

  if ((average)) 2>/dev/null; then
     average=$((average))
   else
     average=0;
  fi
 if ((comp1)) 2>/dev/null; then
     comp1=$((comp1))
  else
     comp1=0;
  fi

if [ $average -lt $comp1 ];then
share|improve this answer
add comment

< compares lexicographically. If you want to compare integers then use -lt. If you want to compare floating point numbers then use bc instead of test.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's worse than that, since < isn't quoted or escaped it'll be treated as an input redirect rather than an operator. –  Gordon Davisson Sep 9 '12 at 17:05
add comment

Are you looking for numerical comparison or literal (string) comparison? Different operators may be needed depending on which one.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.