Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Trying to unit test some simple code for a class project, however every time I try to run the test I get an error that there is no home.exe and no main static main method. However, we haven't gotten to the point where we are supposed to have either of those things yet, so how can I run the test without them?

My code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Home
{
    class InventoryType
    {

        /// <summary>
        /// Selects the inventory type and returns the selected value
        /// </summary>
        public class InventorySelect
        {
            private string inventoryTypes;
            public String InventoryTypes
            {
                set
                {
                    inventoryTypes = value;
                }

                get
                {
                    return inventoryTypes;
                }
            }


            /// <summary>
            /// Validate that the inventory is returning some sort of value
            /// </summary>
            /// <returns></returns>
            public bool Validate()
            {
                if (InventoryTypes == null) return false;
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
}

My Test Code

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using Home.InventoryType.InventorySelect;

namespace HomeTest
{
    [TestClass]
    public class TestInventoryTypeCase
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestInventoryTypeClass()
        {
            InventorySelect select = new InventorySelect();
            select.inventoryTypes = "Collection";

            if (Validate() = true)
                Console.WriteLine("Test Passed");
            else
                if (Validate() = false)
                    Console.WriteLine("Test Returned False");
                else
                    Console.WriteLine("Test Failed To Run");

            Console.ReadLine();

        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To run a test on the main menu bar at the top of your Visual Studio... Test - Windows - Test Explorer

In the Test Explorer window, select the test you wish to run and click on the run Icon at the top of the window.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean test view? As there is no test explorer.. all that comes up in test view is a yellow bar that says to refresh, but nothing happens when you hit refresh except that in the error list box it says its trying to build and can't because there is no home.exe and no main static main method... which brings me right back to my original problem –  Expecto Sep 9 '12 at 17:14
    
Was looking in VS 2012 - it is called Test Explorer there - but yes, If you are using VS 2010 it is Test View –  Kevin Sep 9 '12 at 17:16
1  
What type of project is your main Project? If it is not Class Library - you must have a start object/method defined (for console programs that is a static main method). I suspect that you have a console app solution that has no start object/method defined. –  Kevin Sep 9 '12 at 17:20
    
Double click on Properties under your main project - your project type will be labeled Output type: –  Kevin Sep 9 '12 at 17:21
1  
You should also use Assert instead of writing out results to the Console. –  Kevin Sep 9 '12 at 17:26

OK, a couple things here.

  1. Make sure that your Output type for your main project (the project to be tested) is ClassLibrary
  2. Use Assertions in your tests

I created a ClassLibrary solution called ExampleLibrary. Created a class called InventoryType and copied in your code e.g.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ExampleLibrary
{
    class InventoryType 
    { 

        /// <summary> 
        /// Selects the inventory type and returns the selected value 
        /// </summary> 
        public class InventorySelect 
        { 
            private string inventoryTypes; 
            public String InventoryTypes 
            { 
                set 
                { 
                    inventoryTypes = value; 
                } 

                get 
                { 
                    return inventoryTypes; 
                } 
            } 


            /// <summary> 
            /// Validate that the inventory is returning some sort of value 
            /// </summary> 
            /// <returns></returns> 
            public bool Validate() 
            { 
                if (InventoryTypes == null) return false; 
                return true; 
            } 
        } 
    }
}

I then created a Unit Test and coded it as follows:

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using ExampleLibrary;

namespace HomeTest
{
    [TestClass]
    public class TestInventoryTypeCase
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestInventoryTypeClass()
        {
            InventoryType.InventorySelect select = new InventoryType.InventorySelect();
            select.InventoryTypes = "Collection";

            Assert.IsTrue(select.Validate());
            select.InventoryTypes = null;
            Assert.IsFalse(select.Validate());
        }
    }
}

I compile and run the test as described above and it runs and returns Test Passed.

share|improve this answer
    
edit - added second Assertion to test the other state of Validate(). –  Kevin Sep 9 '12 at 17:59
    
I have an issue with your test example. It should be two tests -- one that tests that when the InventoryTypes property isn't null, the Validate method returns true, and one that validates the opposite behavior. Bad unit tests are arguably worse than no unit tests. –  Daniel Mann Sep 9 '12 at 18:01
    
Not certain I agree with you. My philosophy in unit tests has always been to test a unit of behavior. The defined behavior here is that when the InvertoryTypes property is null Validate returns false else it returns true (a single unit of behavior). In my mind this should require only one test. –  Kevin Sep 9 '12 at 18:10
    
The testing methodology debate asside though - kudos to the OP for recognizing the importance of testing his code as part of his learning process! –  Kevin Sep 9 '12 at 18:19
    
Agreed! I hope that someday everyone unit tests. –  Daniel Mann Sep 9 '12 at 19:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.