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I wonder if it is possible to show a library user that a function needs a callback with let's say 5 parameters 3 of which are arrays (for example). Or in other words, how to inform the programmer not to mess up with the callback arguments? Here's a code example:

function doSomething(someArray, callback) {
    var i = 0;
    for ( i = 0; i < someArray.length; i += 1) {
        callback(someArray[i]);
    }
}

How a programmer would find out what parameters should their callback function accept?

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You mean like intellisense? (From the Wikipedia page - " IntelliSense is a convenient way to access descriptions of functions, particularly their parameter lists") –  ErmSo Sep 9 '12 at 17:45
    
it is not possible to declare parameter types in javascript, not even declaring of argument count is possible, so its up to the programmer to make a lot of typechecking, or just documenting it. –  philipp Sep 9 '12 at 17:47
1  
This is what documentation is for. –  SLaks Sep 9 '12 at 17:51
    
It's not impossible, but it would require static code analysis to point out such mistake. I am not aware of any tools can now do this. –  HoLyVieR Sep 9 '12 at 17:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Javascript does not have type checking for arguments and there is no way for you to do runtime checking of a callback to see what arguments it is expecting. One thing you can do at runtime is you can check callback.length to see how many arguments it has declared that it is expecting as formal parameters. It is not required for a function to define it's formal parameters as it can also use the arguments object to get the arguments, but if you wanted to force them to program a certain way, you could check it this way. See this doc for more info.

Your best option is good documentation to make it absolutely clear (often with sample code too) how a callback should be written.

If you want to bulletproof your library a bit, you could catch any exceptions that were thrown in the callback and handle them however is appropriate.

function doSomething(someArray, callback) {
    var i = 0;
    for ( i = 0; i < someArray.length; i += 1) {
        try {
            callback(someArray[i]);
        } catch(e) {
            // handle any exception in the callback
        }
    }
}
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I guess not only seeing what arguments but also how many is also not possible. Thanks jfriend00 and philipp. –  Dr. Nefario Sep 9 '12 at 18:10
    
@NikolaGeneshki - I added some info about callback.length to my answer. –  jfriend00 Sep 9 '12 at 18:18

By documenting it. Usually documented convention works as good as having a enforced contract via language. At-most you can pass a single object to callbacks and that object can have named attributes e.g.

callback({'names':[], 'types':[], value:0, etc:[] })

That way it is more easy for both side code to be well documented.

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