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Hi i'm relatively new to java programming. The following program i've written seems to be taking a lot of memory(around 240 MB, is it normal? - I don't think so!) Please suggest some ways to optimise this program so to reduce memory storage.

Program -

 You have 2 sorted array suppose arr1[4] and arr2[3]
          now we have to combinely sort them using very little extra space(i.e. in-place sort)
          ex..arr1[4]={5,8,11,14,16}
          arr[2]={1,7,10}
          then result should be--in arr1[4]={1,5,7,8,10}
          in arr2[3]={11,14,16}

Code -

import java.util.*;

class sort_in_place
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        // input 2 sorted arrays
        int []a = {5,8,11,14,16};
        int []b = {1,7,10};

        System.out.println("initial array: a = "+Arrays.toString(a)+"   b = "+Arrays.toString(b)+"\n");

        // use extra space to store the array 'a' elements.
        int key = 0, i=0; 

        for( i=0; i<a.length ; i++)
        {
             key = a[i];         // store value in temporary variable key.

            // if key is greater than 1st element of array 'b' then exchange their values and sort array 'b'
            if(key > b[0])
            {
                int j = 1;
                a[i] = b[0];
                while(j<b.length && key > b[j])
                {
                    b[j-1] = b[j];
                    j++;
                }
                b[j-1] = key;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("final array: a = "+Arrays.toString(a)+"   b = "+Arrays.toString(b)+"\n");
    }
}
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9  
Define "uses 24M"; how have you arrived at that number? Plus that's hard to read. –  Dave Newton Sep 9 '12 at 17:54
    
.. and in addition please edit your question so your code is well placed inside code snippet. –  Mert Sep 9 '12 at 17:56
1  
What is your performance goal numbers and (as Dave commented) what exact value (perf counters on Windows,...) you are using? It is not good idea to "optimize" something when you have no good measurable goal. –  Alexei Levenkov Sep 9 '12 at 17:58
1  
@DaveNewton see the following link,[link] (ideone.com/pUszr) memory taken is 245632 kB. –  abhey Sep 9 '12 at 18:10
2  
@abhey That's ~240M, not 24M, FWIW. –  Dave Newton Sep 9 '12 at 18:30
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to remember that a Java program cannot run on its own, but need the Java Virtual Machine platform to handle memory, byte code execution and other tasks. The Oracle JVM uses quite a bit of memory to speed up execution so even trivially small programs come with a large start-up penalty.

This is why small utilities are rarely written in Java.

You need to measure inside the JVM to determine if you use too much memory. Use a profiler for that. JVisualVM in the JDK is a good, free starting profiler.

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Thanks. I'll be using a profiler from now on. –  abhey Sep 9 '12 at 19:28
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Even to run a simple Helloworld program java will be needing 300+ classes to be loaded. What I mean here is Java intializing needs memory. Java has Xmx and Xms options for defining the memory usage. For more details go through Java documentation

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24 MB is normal for a jvm process.

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Your program uses far less memory than the 240 MB ideone reports. I just ran it on my notebook, inserted System.in.read(); at the end of main() to delay termination, and looked at the corresponding process with the windows task manager. Reported peak memory use was 9 MB ...

Most of that will be the infrastructure of the JVM (such as the just in time compiler), and completely unrelated to your program.

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Thanks for info. –  abhey Sep 9 '12 at 19:26
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