Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What does the following code look at runtime after type erasure:

public class Test<T> {

T lst;
List<T> list1;
void meth() throws InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException{  T res = (T)lst.getClass().newInstance();}

static <S> void meth(S t){}
}  
class TestUse{
public static void main(String[] args) {
Test<Integer> gint = new Test<Integer>();
Test<String> gstr = new Test<String>();
gint.meth();
gstr.meth();

}   
share|improve this question
5  
you haven't defined Genrics class. –  gigadot Sep 9 '12 at 18:39
1  
After type erasure Genrics<Integer> gint = new Genrics<Integer>(); will look like Genrics gint = new Genrics(); . –  Bhesh Gurung Sep 9 '12 at 18:41
    
It doesn't 'look like' anything at runtime, because it doesn't compile. –  EJP Sep 10 '12 at 2:28

3 Answers 3

The following piece of code would not work:

T res = (T)lst.getClass().newInstance();

Since T is of type Object at runtime in all the possible cases.

One workaround is using generics with inheritance:

public abstract class Generic<T> {

    public abstract Class<T> getConcreteClass();

    public void doSomething() {
        Class<T> clazz = getConcreteClass();
        T t = clazz.newInstance();
        doSomethingWithT();
    }
}

public class ConcreteClass extends Generic<YourObject> {
    public Class<YourObject> getConcreteClass() {
        return YourObject.class;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
No the code works fyn ..dont know why –  user1649415 Sep 9 '12 at 18:57
    
@user1649415: You haven't instantiated lst; it should throw a NullPointerException when calling getClass(). –  m3th0dman Sep 10 '12 at 6:34

I think it looks like this

public class Test {

    Object lst;
    List list1;
    void meth() throws InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException{  
        Object res =lst.getCla ss().newInstance();
    }

   static void meth(Object t){
   }
}

class TestUse{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Genrics gint = new Genrics();
        Genrics gstr = new Genrics();
        gint.meth();
        gstr.meth();
    }   

although I do not think this would compile as it stands. There is no Genrics class - or is that the Test class.

share|improve this answer
    
The Test class has a no-param meth() instance method. –  Ted Hopp Sep 9 '12 at 18:44
    
Thanks Ted, my mistake. Let me update –  RNJ Sep 9 '12 at 18:49

Assuming that your Genrics class is actually your Test class, it should be equivalent to something like this:

public class Genrics {

    Object lst;
    List list1;
    void meth() throws InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException {
        Object res = lst.getClass().newInstance();
    }

    static void meth(Object t){}
}  
class TestUse{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Genrics gint = new Genrics();
        Genrics gstr = new Genrics();
        gint.meth();
        gstr.meth();
}

Whether my assumption is right or wrong, the way to think about this is that all generic type parameters are simply erased from your code and replaced with the most specific bound for the type parameter (Object in your case) or nothing where appropriate. Casts are introduced where needed.

The details of how type erasure works are spelled out in the Java Language Specification.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.