Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I read Dependency Injection Without the Gymnastics PDF which indicates there's no need for any fancy DI framework, but it's beyond my grasp (at least without concrete examples). I'll try watching Dependency Injection Without the Gymnastics and Dead Simple Dependency Injection when I have a chance.

Using Guice in Java, if A depends on both B and C and both B and C depend on D, one would have something like:

public class A {
    @Inject
    public A(B b, C c) {
        this.b = b;
        this.c = c;
    }
}

public class B {
    @Inject
    public B(D d) {
        this.d = d;
    }
}

public class C {
    @Inject
    public C(D d) {
        this.d = d;
    }
}

public class D { /* ... */ }

and a module that says which implementation of D to use, then one would just ask for an instance of A from the injector:

A a = injector.createInstance(A.class);

Given what's presented in the URLs above, how would the Scala-equivalent of the above code look?

FWIW, I'm also investigating https://github.com/dickwall/subcut/blob/master/GettingStarted.md and am simply trying to understand the anti-DI solution.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Implicit parameters are completely sufficient for the use case you're describing.

case class A(implicit b: B, c: C)
case class B(implicit d: D)
case class C(implicit d: D)
class D { /* ... */ }

implicit val theD = new D
implicit val theB = B()
implicit val theC = C()

Now you can ask for an A just by:

val a = A()
share|improve this answer
    
"In Scala 2.10, you can write implicit class instead of separately writing the class and the implicit instance." Eh? No you can't. Or am I the confused one? I think implicit class is about implicit conversions, not implicit parameters. –  Seth Tisue Sep 10 '12 at 23:28
    
Seth, you're totally right, an implicit class can't take implicit parameters at all. –  Apocalisp Sep 11 '12 at 2:02
    
I think this and/or using the Reader Monad is the closest one can get without a framework. The downside is that there's no auto-wiring and people will have to instantiate objects in the right order. –  Noel Yap Sep 11 '12 at 13:43
2  
That's simply not true. The implicit resolution performs the same steps as "auto-wiring". –  Apocalisp Sep 11 '12 at 13:50

You may solve it with self-types.

A depends on both B and C and both B and C depend on D

so one could write this like that:

class A {
  self: B with C => 
}

trait B { 
  self: D => 
}

trait C {
  self: D => 
}

trait D {}

and then on a call side:

val x = new A with BImpl with CImpl with DImpl

but code below won't compile, because dependencies on B,C,D classes not resolved:

val x = new A
share|improve this answer
1  
You mean self types, right, not self-classes? –  Travis Brown Sep 10 '12 at 2:33
    
If it doesn't compile, it's not a complete solution. I'd say a complete solution allows the user to specify only the implementation of D to use and be able to create an instance of A. –  Noel Yap Sep 10 '12 at 3:27
    
@TravisBrown yeah, you right –  om-nom-nom Sep 10 '12 at 8:27
    
@NoelYap, I think you misunderstood; the second last code line compiles giving the desired instance of A. –  Scott Morrison Sep 10 '12 at 9:50
    
@ScottMorrison, yes, I did misunderstand. I think the solution is still not that good, though, since it requires the user of A to know the dependence of B and C upon D (IIUC, 'with DImpl' has to go after the other 'with' clauses). It's also not very scalable because of this (in essence, the user of A would have to perform the topological sort of the entire dependency graph). –  Noel Yap Sep 10 '12 at 13:49

It's tricky to provide that type of dependency injection. Most of the above examples require you to create the implicits near where the classes are instantiated.

Closest I could come up with is:

class A(implicit b:B, c:C)
class B(implicit d:D)
class C(implicit d:D)
trait D { //the interface 
  def x:Unit
}

object Implicits {
  implicit def aFactory:A = new A
  implicit lazy val bInstance:B = new B
  implicit def cFactory:C = new C
  implicit def dFactory:D = new D {
     def x:Unit = {/* some code */}
  }
}

And then in your code you use it like this:

import Implicits._

object MyApplication {
   def main(args: Array[String]):Unit = {
      val a = new A
   }
}

If you need to be able to specify different versions when you (for example) are testing, you could do something like this:

import Implicits._

object MyApplication {

  // Define the actual implicits
  Implicits.module = new Module {
    import Implicits._

    def a = new A
    lazy val b = new B
    def c = new C
    def d = new D {
      def x = println("x")
    }
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]):Unit = {
    val a = new A // or val a = implicitly[A] 
  }

}

// The contract (all elements that you need)
trait Module {
  def a: A
  def b: B
  def c: C
  def d: D
}

// Making the contract available as implicits
object Implicits {
  var module: Module = _

  implicit def aFactory:A = module.a
  implicit def bFactory:B = module.b
  implicit def cFactory:C = module.c
  implicit def dFactory:D = module.d
}

This would allow you to simply import Implicits._ in any file and would provide a similar workflow as the one in the original question.

In most cases however I would not use this tactic. I would simply make the implicit available in classes that create instances:

object MyApplication {

  implicit def a: A = new A
  implicit lazy val b: B = new B
  implicit def c: C = new C
  implicit def d: D = new D {
    def x: Unit = println("x")
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val a = implicitly[A]
    val e = new E
  }

}

class E(implicit d:D) {
    new C
}

Here E is defined in another file and creates an instance of C. We require D to be passed to E and with that document that E depends on D (via C).

share|improve this answer

I think @om-nom-nom's answer is quite close to what you want. Here is what I've got:

class A {
  self: B with C => 

  def sum = tripleD + doubleD
}

trait B { 
  self: D => 

  def tripleD = x * 3
}

trait C {
  self: D => 

  def doubleD = x * 2
}

trait D extends B with C {
  val x: Int
}

trait E extends D {
  val x = 3
}

trait F extends D {
  val x = 4
}

val a = new A with E
val b = new A with F

println("a.sum = " + a.sum)
println("b.sum = " + b.sum)
share|improve this answer
    
That solution requires D to know about B and C even though the dependency is the other way around. –  Noel Yap Sep 11 '12 at 4:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.