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First of all this might be messy, because i'm pretty new to programming in general.
Well im making a rpg game and i want all my weapons to be in a file called Weapons.cpp.
I made it so that i got all of my global variables such as "weaponDamage" and "weaponName" in a header file called common.h so that I can acces and manipulate those variables from both my main and my .cpp file. But the problem is that it cant seem to find those variables and functions in my header. Heres some code:

common.h:

#include <string>  
#ifndef COMMON_H_INCLUDED  
#define COMMON_H_INCLUDED  

//global variables  
extern int pureDamage = 0;  
extern int pureHealth = 0;  
extern int weaponDamage;  
extern int armorDefense;  
extern int totalDamage = pureDamage + weaponDamage;  
extern int totalHealth = pureHealth + armorDefense;  
extern int totalLuck;  
extern string starsign;  
extern string weaponName;  

//all weapons  

void weaponSwordIron();  
void weaponSwordGold();  
void weaponSwordSwordOfTheHeavens();  
void weaponBowSimple();  
void weaponBowLongBow();  
void weaponBowThunder();  
void weaponStaffStaffOfFlames();  
void weaponStaffStaffOfLightning();  
void weaponStaffStaffOfAssKicking();  

#endif // COMMON_H_INCLUDED  

Weapons.cpp:

#include <iostream>  
#include <string>  
#include <common.h>  


using namespace std;

void weaponSwordIron()
{
    int weaponDamage = 5;
    string weaponName = "Iron Sword";
}
void weaponSwordGold()
{
    int weaponDamage = 8;
    string weaponName = "Gold Sword";
}
void weaponSwordSwordOfTheHeavens()
{
    int weaponDamage = 15;
    string weaponName = "Sword Of The Heavens";
}
void weaponBowSimple()
{
    int weaponDamage = 5;
    string weaponName = "Simple Bow";
}
void weaponBowLongBow()
{
    int weaponDamage = 8;
    string weaponName = "Long Bow";
}
void weaponBowThunder()
{
    int weaponDamage = 15;
    string weaponName = "Thunder Bow";
}
void weaponStaffStaffOfFlames()
{
    int weaponDamage = 5;
    string weaponName = "Staff Of Flames";
}
void weaponStaffStaffOfLightning()
{
    int weaponDamage = 8;
    string weaponName = "Staff Of Lightning";
}
void weaponStaffStaffOfAssKicking()
{
    int weaponDamage = 15;
    string weaponName = "Staff Of Ass Kicking";
} 

and a little piece of my main, the function called GiveWeapon():

void GiveWeapon()
{

    system("cls");
    if (starsign == "mage")
    {
        weaponSwordIron();
        cout << weaponDamage;
        cout << weaponName;
    }
    else if (starsign == "warrior")
    {
        weaponBowSimple();
    }
    else if (starsign == "archer")
    {
        weaponStaffStaffOfFlames();
    }
    else
    {
        ChooseStarsign();
    }
    AssignAttributes();
}  

And yes I did remember to include common.h
Now the error my ide code blocks comes up with is : error: common.h: no such file or directory
I dont know why it comes up with that so please help

Sorry for the long post and thanks in advance

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2  
I think the last thing you want to do as a new programmer is make an RPG. imo they need a much more robust design than other types of games, which starts with OOP. –  chris Sep 9 '12 at 19:23
    
you need to write #include "common.h" –  elyashiv Sep 9 '12 at 19:24
    
Is the header in the same location as the cpp file? –  Luchian Grigore Sep 9 '12 at 19:25
2  
You should be avoiding global variables, I think. Functions such as void weaponSwordIron() { int weaponDamage = 5; string weaponName = "Iron Sword"; } initialize two local variables which are destroyed when the function returns, rendering the initialization pointless. The functions effectively do nothing. If you dropped the types from the functions, you'd be modifying the global variables — which at least makes the functions useful (though I have reservations about the use of globals). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 19:30
1  
The #include <string> in 'common.h' should be inside the header guards (just after the #define). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 19:32

4 Answers 4

Use "common.h" instead of <common.h>. The angled ones are for library files.

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@LuchianGrigore: depending on the compiler. –  Dani Sep 9 '12 at 19:25

You should use "common.h" not < common.h>

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1  
That shouldn't make a difference for a standard conforming compiler. –  juanchopanza Sep 9 '12 at 19:25
2  
@juanchopanza: It might. The angle brackets means 'search in system defined locations only'; the quotes means 'search in perhaps some other places, then search in the system defined locations'. Fortunately, the -I option counts as a system-defined location. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 19:28
    
Angle brackets suppress warnings from header being included. Also, I can include local headers this way. –  Pavel Ognev Sep 10 '12 at 5:52

weopens.cpp is mostly non-sense.

i tried compiling the following:

void a() {
 int b = 5; }

int main()
{
 a();
 return 0;
}

and g++ didn't like the idea.

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2  
It also doesn't like the idea of void main in a hosted implementation. –  chris Sep 9 '12 at 19:36

Where is your "common.h" placed? You must specify relative path to them from folder with the "Weapons.cpp".

At second, you define local variables in your functions. Your Weapons.cpp file must look like:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include "relative/path/to/common.h"

//global variables
int pureDamage = 0;
int pureHealth = 0;
int weaponDamage;
int armorDefense;
int totalDamage = pureDamage + weaponDamage;
int totalHealth = pureHealth + armorDefense;
int totalLuck;
string starsign;
string weaponName;

using namespace std;

void weaponSwordIron()
{
    weaponDamage = 5;
    weaponName = "Iron Sword";
}
void weaponSwordGold()
{
    weaponDamage = 8;
    weaponName = "Gold Sword";
}
...
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