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This example uses a common variadic template and function. I want to print out the arguments passed to f:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
void print(T t) {
   std::cout << t << std::endl;
}

template <typename...T>
void f(T &&...args) {
   print(args...);
   f(args...);
}

int main() {

    f(2, 1, 4, 3, 5);

}

But I'm getting the following errors:

Compilation finished with errors:
source.cpp: In instantiation of 'void f(T ...) [with T = {int, int, int, int, int}]':
source.cpp:16:20: required from here
source.cpp:10:4: error: no matching function for call to 'print(int&, int&, int&, int&, int&)'
source.cpp:10:4: note: candidate is:
source.cpp:4:6: note: template<class T> void print(T)
source.cpp:4:6: note: template argument deduction/substitution failed: source.cpp:10:4: note: candidate expects 1 argument, 5 provided

This is actually my first time using variadic functions and I don't exactly understand how to use them well. I also don't get why this isn't working and what I can do to help it.

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See Stroustup C++11 FAQ: stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html#variadic-templates –  Nikolai N Fetissov Sep 9 '12 at 20:24
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There you go. You had several mistakes in your code, you can see the comments between the lines below:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
void print(T t) {
   std::cout << t << std::endl;
}

// Base case, no args
void f() {}

// Split the parameter pack.
// We want the first argument, so we can print it.
// And the rest so we can forward it to the next call to f
template <typename T, typename...Ts>
void f(T &&first, Ts&&... rest) {
    // print it
    print(std::forward<T>(first));
    // Forward the rest.
    f(std::forward<Ts>(rest)...);
}

int main() {
    f(2, 1, 4, 3, 5);
}

Note that using rvalue refs here makes no sense. You're not storing the parameters anywhere, so simply passing them by const reference should do it. That way you'd also avoid using std::forward just to keep the (useless) perfect forwarding.

Therefore, you could rewrite f as follows:

template <typename T, typename...Ts>
void f(const T &first, const Ts&... rest) {
    print(first);
    f(rest...);
}
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What is foward? –  0x499602D2 Sep 9 '12 at 20:28
    
This article explains it very well: thbecker.net/articles/rvalue_references/section_01.html. –  mfontanini Sep 9 '12 at 20:29
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You're recursing infinitely. You need to remove one element from the pack each time:

void print() { }                            // 0-argument overload

template <typename Head, typename ...Tail>
void print(Head const & h, Tail const &... t)         // 1+-argument overload
{
    std::cout << h;
    print(t...);
}

You can wrap your function call up with the printing:

template <typename ...Args>
void print_and_f(Args &&... args)
{
    print(args...);
    f(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

Usage:

print_and_f(1, 2, 3);  // calls "f(1, 2, 3)" eventually.
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What is std::foward? –  0x499602D2 Sep 9 '12 at 20:26
    
@David: it's a cast function. I thought you wanted that, because of your universal references. You can just remove that, though; it shouldn't make any difference for printing. –  Kerrek SB Sep 9 '12 at 20:28
    
@David: I've revised the answer to cater for your function call f. I wouldn't really use this solution, though, and rather bake the printing into the actual function f directly. –  Kerrek SB Sep 9 '12 at 20:33
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