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I'm running Windows 7 Ultimate x64, but my experience dates back to DOS 3.0.

Since like DOS 3.1 you've been able to append a file to another one with this use of the COPY command:

COPY FILE1+FILE2=FILE1

Making the need for a temporary FILE3 unnecessary.

It was a very convenient command since whenever you added a new program you often needed to update your CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files.

It also used to be that getting the order correct was importiant, otherwise you'd end up with an empty FILE1.

But today when I tried that, it left FILE1 untouched, and when I reversed the order, it (understandably) made FILE1 a copy of FILE2.

Does anyone know if it's been replaced with another method, and when this change happened?

EDIT:

I've been doing more testing, and oddly even though the above code won't work, you still can sill copy from the console and append that to an existing file like this:

copy file1+con=file1
Type some text to append to file1
^Z ([CTRL]+Z the End Of File character)

I'm wondering if my version of Windows is messed up somehow. Can any body replicate my findings?

EDIT:

It works on 95 / 98 / ME / 2000 / XP / XP Mode / 7 Professional x64 / 8 x64. So I imagine that it's not a 7 Ultimate x64 problem, but rather an issue with my machine.

* Sigh *

EDIT:

Last edit, I promise. :)

It was not an issue with my machine, it was an issue with File1. Apparently when I first appended File2 to it, the [CTRL]+Z (EOF character) never got overwritten, causing the file to look like this:

Original Data
Original Data
[EOF]
Appended Data
Appended Data
Appended Data

You can duplicate this yourself with the following experiment from at the command prompt. (Where ^Z is the character [CTRL]+Z )

At the command prompt type:

copy con file1
File One
^Z^Z

copy con file2
File Two
^Z

copy con file3
File Three
^Z

copy file1+file2=file1

copy file2+file3=file2

TYPE file1
TYPE file2

You will see:

file1

File One

file2

File Two
File Three

You can type file2 >> file1 or use nearly any other method of concatenating files, and when you type file1 it will still only appear to contain File One. BUT if you use FIND "searchterm" file to parse the file it will show you what's REALLY going on. In this case type:

FIND " " file1

And you will be rewarded with:

---------- FILE1
File One
→File Two
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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Windows 8 x86:

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.2.9200]
(c) 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

C:\Users\Nikos>echo foo>file1

C:\Users\Nikos>echo bar>file2

C:\Users\Nikos>copy /b file1 + file2 file1
file1
file2
        1 file(s) copied.

C:\Users\Nikos>type file1
foo
bar
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. That bodes ill for me. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 21:13
    
what do you get when copying foo+bar=foo? –  nikos1993pl Sep 9 '12 at 21:22
    
I get the original version of foo. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 22:45
    
I have verified that copy file1+file2=file1 works on Windows 7 Professional x64, so I believe that it's probably my machine. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 22:48
    
Thanks for helping me figure this out. :) –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 23:00

What about type file2 >> file1

share|improve this answer
2  
That won't work with binary files. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 20:54
    
@JamesK You never stated "binary" in your question. What exactly do you want to do then? –  Eitan T Sep 9 '12 at 20:56
    
@EitanT - I'm just wondering if that functionality has disappeared from windows because it's more efficient than any other built-in method of concatenation of files, binary OR text. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 21:06
    
Actually, that doesn't work either. The problem is that the file got two EOF characters at the end of it, so when appending using almost any method, one EOF character survives with the appended text coming after it. –  James K Sep 10 '12 at 3:12

make sure you start with fresh files you never tried to copy over.
I just found that on my (XP sp3) copy a+b a without /b appends 1A (SUB) to the end of the file which makes anything after it disappear from output of type (but more will show it). Copy /b a+b a works.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I was able to confirm that it works on XP. Well, XP Mode anyway. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 22:41

Did you try copy /b file1 + file2 file1

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Yes. I've tried every iteration I can think of and every one I've run across. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 21:01

copy /b input1 + input2 output
del input1
ren output input1
Maybe this? :P

share|improve this answer
    
Sure, even copy /b file1 + file2 file3 move file3 file1 works. I'm not trying to replace the functionality, I'm trying to discover if it's been removed from the COPY command (and when), or if my computer is messed up. –  James K Sep 9 '12 at 21:09
C:\Users\Nikos>type file1
foo
bar

C:\Users\Nikos>copy file1+con=file1
file1
con
ihdui
ohisd
^Z
        1 file(s) copied.

C:\Users\Nikos>type file1
foo
bar
ihdui
ohisd
share|improve this answer
@echo off

cls

type "file2.txt" >> "file1.txt"

exit
share|improve this answer
    
please explain it properly ... –  Stark Sep 3 '13 at 14:25

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