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My JavaScript function

function B_modeWindow (id,cords) {  
    loading();

    var xmlhttp;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
    } else {
        xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function() {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200) {

            var cords = document.getElementById(cords)
            cords.innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
            var xy = cords.split("x");          
            hideloading();
        }
    }

    xmlhttp.open("GET","processMapEdit.php?id="+id+"&x="+xy[0]+"&y="+xy[1],true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}

returns:

Uncaught ReferenceError: xy is not defined 

in:

xmlhttp.open("GET","processMapEdit.php?id="+id+"&x="+xy[0]+"&y="+xy[1],true);

It seems that xy is just not there, but it's defined just 5 lines above! What is wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
They're not defined in the same scope, so no, it actually isn't defined. But how are you hoping to open the request with the values it will get after it's sent? –  minitech Sep 9 '12 at 20:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

xy is only defined in the scope of the anonymous function xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function () { // valid scope of xy }. Thus, it's not accessible outside of this anonymous function. Use the following instead:

function B_modeWindow (id,cords) {  
    loading();

    var xmlhttp;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
    } else {
        xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }

    var xy = cords.split("x"); 

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function() {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200) {
            var cordsElement = document.getElementById(cords);
            cordsElement.innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;      
            hideloading();
        }
    }

    xmlhttp.open("GET","processMapEdit.php?id="+id+"&x="+xy[0]+"&y="+xy[1],true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}

This way, the scope of xy is the function B_modeWindow instead of the anonynmous function.

Also, note that even if you could access xy outside of the anonymous function (which you can't), xy won't be defined as well, since you are defining it only when the AJAX request completes, and you need to use it to actually make the AJAX call.

Another suggestion is for you to use different variable names for cords. You are using it first to split its content by x, and then defining another cords variable to assign a DOM element. Although this works, it can be confusing.

share|improve this answer
    
Now it says Uncaught TypeError: Object #<HTMLDivElement> has no method 'split' B_modeWindow.js:22 B_modeWindow B_modeWindow.js:22 (anonymous function) –  Szymon Toda Sep 9 '12 at 21:00
    
@user1656447: Please try my update. I got confused by the duplicated variable names called cords. It should work now. –  João Silva Sep 9 '12 at 21:01

You need to define xy variable outside of onreadystatechange function for it to be available where you are using it.

This should work:

function B_modeWindow (id,cords) {  
    var xy = null; // defined xy here

    loading();

    var xmlhttp;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
    } else {
        xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function() {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200) {

            var cords = document.getElementById(cords)
            cords.innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
            xy = cords.split("x");          // removed var keyword here
            hideloading();
        }
    }

    xmlhttp.open("GET","processMapEdit.php?id="+id+"&x="+xy[0]+"&y="+xy[1],true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}

Please note that ajax calls are asynic by default, so even if scope is fixed, the xy variable might not have what you are looking for. In that case, you will have to use callback inside ajax request somehow to capture the actual value

share|improve this answer
    
You say that var xy = cords.split("x"); needs to be global, right? –  Szymon Toda Sep 9 '12 at 20:50
    
@user1656447: I have updated the answer, please check. –  Blaster Sep 9 '12 at 20:51
    
Not necessarily global, it can be declared in B_modeWindow –  Matt Greer Sep 9 '12 at 20:51

You put the declaration in the wrong function. Also, you'll want to give the cords in the callback a different name, or things will break.

function B_modeWindow (id,cords) {
    var xy = cords.split("x");

    loading();

    var xmlhttp;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    } else {
        xmlhttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200) {
            var cordsElement = document.getElementById(cords);
            cordsElement.innerHTML = xmlhttp.responseText;
            hideloading();
        }
    };

    xmlhttp.open("GET", "processMapEdit.php?id=" + id + "&x=" + xy[0] + "&y=" + xy[1], true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}
share|improve this answer

Yeah, xy is defined but it's defined within curly braces - it goes out of scope, or stops exiting by the time you get to the problem line. *EDIT: see below comments. This statement is of mine is just plain wrong *

To fix it, just define xy above the xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function() line. Or better yet, at the top of the func.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not about the curly braces, it's about the function; and the function hasn't even run at that time. –  minitech Sep 9 '12 at 20:53
    
Er, yes it is about the curly braces - they just so happen in this case to designate the start and end of an anonymous function. However you do make a good point about the block that they're in not having been run yet - somewhat irrelevant, but good nonetheless. –  enhzflep Sep 9 '12 at 21:09
    
No, it's not about the curly braces. JavaScript doesn't have block scope. Try it: var a = 5; {var a = 10;} console.log(a); // 10 –  minitech Sep 9 '12 at 21:12
    
Thank-you minitech. :thumbsup:My most humble apologies are offered and are yours to accept or reject. –  enhzflep Sep 9 '12 at 21:21

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