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I'm still trying to solve an issue I have with string formatting and I just can't seem to get it working.

I have two functions that give me Integers out as they are just calculations and I want to create a string with these two calculations in a third and new output AND make it nice and pretty. I'd like to present it in like a table (colums and rows).

What I am trying so far is:

   tableShow :: Int -> Int -> String
   tableShow n 0 = putStrLn (n  power1  power2)
   tableShow n k 
       | let list_k = [0..k]
       | k > 0      =  show(unlines[n ++ "\t" calc1 x k ++ "\t" ++ "\t" ++ calc2 x k | x <- list_k])

calc1 and calc2 just take two Integers given by user and do a simple calculation on them, returning a value. At least I got those working like a charm. :)

Anyone have a good idea where I am going wrong?!? Is there someone who can point me in the right direction?

Any and all ideas and suggestions will be greatly appreciated, I've been at this all weekend now :/

//regards

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What are the error messages? What output does the program give you, and how does this differ from what you expect? (On that note, what output do you expect?) –  huon-dbaupp Sep 9 '12 at 21:05
    
What exactly is wrong with your output here? Are you getting any compiler errors? If so, what are they? If not, what is the output and how does it differ from what you want? –  Code-Apprentice Sep 9 '12 at 21:06
1  
@dbaupp jinx on you –  Code-Apprentice Sep 9 '12 at 21:07
    
(Also, you seem to be making similar mistakes to your previous haskell question, did you try some of the suggestions there?) –  huon-dbaupp Sep 9 '12 at 21:10
    
Oh yes i tried it all and then some but i cant get my head araound this and i am reading eveerything i can find about it, but i cant seem to get any better at at it and i just refuse to give up:) Thanks for all the help thou!! i appriciate it alot! –  user1501127 Sep 9 '12 at 23:07

2 Answers 2

tableShow :: Int -> Int -> String
tableShow n 0 = putStrLn (n  power1  power2)
tableShow n k 
    | let list_k = [0..k]
    | k > 0      =  show(unlines[n ++ "\t" calc1 x k ++ "\t" ++ "\t" ++ calc2 x k | x <- list_k])

You didn't mention whether your problem was an error or just that your function doesn't work as intended, but your let binding syntax is off, and you missed a ++. I don't know what you intended for n power1 power2, but I'll guess that you wanted multiplication. It should be:

tableShow :: Int -> Int -> String
tableShow n 0 = putStrLn (n * power1 * power2)
tableShow n k
    | k > 0 = let list_k = [0..k] in 
              show(unlines[n ++ "\t" ++ calc1 x k ++ "\t" ++ "\t" ++ calc2 x k | x <- list_k])

You may want to look over a tutorial or two to get the syntax down.

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That first clause (for tableShow n 0) looks like it needs a bit of work, too. –  Daniel Wagner Sep 9 '12 at 22:00
    
You're right, I overlooked that. –  LeepySham Sep 9 '12 at 22:03

To turn basic values like Ints into Strings, use show.

multMsg x y = "The product of " ++ show x ++ " and " ++ show y ++ " is " ++ show (x*y)

I usually use concat in this situation though.

multMsg2 x y = concat ["The product of ", show x, " and ", show y, " is ", show (x*y)]
share|improve this answer
    
The Text.Printf module is good for this. –  John L Sep 10 '12 at 4:49
    
Haskell's sprintf is kind of black magic. I wanted to keep my answer straightforward. –  NovaDenizen Sep 11 '12 at 15:12

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