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If I map my spring application to process all incoming requests ('/*'), then requests for static content return 404's. For example, a request for "myhost.com/css/global.css" would return a 404, even though the resource exists as Spring intercepts the request.

The alternative is to map SpringMVC to a subdirectory (for example '/home/'), but in this case, you must pass this directory in all links within the application. Is there a way to map SpringMVC to '/' and exclude a set of directories from processing?

My current web.xml configuration is:

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>springApp</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>org.springframework.web.servlet.DispatcherServlet</servlet-class>
    <load-on-startup>2</load-on-startup>
</servlet>

<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>springApp</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/home/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

Idealy I would like to have the mapping be something like the following:

 <servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>springApp</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
    <exclude>/css/*,/js/*</exclude>
 </servlet-mapping>

Is this type of thing possible?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want to do this with Spring only, it's possible but a bit messy:

  1. You'll either need to use a SimpleUrlHandlerMapping for which you can explicitly specify URL patterns which should be mapped to controllers OR extend it to support "ignore" URLs like "css/**".
  2. You'll need to write your own HttpRequestHandler implementation that would basically consist of "getServletContext().getRequestDsipatcher().include()" call to return the requested resource as is.
  3. You'll have to register that handler as defaultHandler for the above SimpleUrlHandlerMapping.

Once all that is done, all requests that can't be mapped to your controllers will be forwarded to your HttpRequestHandler and served "as is".

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1  
I'm currently using DefaultAnnotationHandlerMapping to do annotation based mapping of controllers. Based upon your suggestion, I am going to extend it and add support for path based exclusions. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. –  Rich Kroll Aug 5 '09 at 20:55
    
Awesome answer! –  Alex Beardsley Aug 5 '09 at 22:43
    
In case anyone misses it, note that a much better solution exists for Spring 3.x. Check out the answer below! –  Alex Beardsley Jun 5 '13 at 18:32

NOTE: this answer applies to Spring 3.0.4+ ONLY

(BTW, this question has also been dealt with here: Spring serving static content with mvc:resources, invalid xsd)

Check out the Spring mvc-showcase project in the Spring subversion samples repository. It shows exactly what you want to do, namely that you can delineate static resources which will not be processed by the DisapatcherServlet. See file /mvc-showcase/src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/spring/appServlet/servlet-context.xml. Here's a snippet of how I handle these exclusions, where the JS, CSS, and images are in the app context root (with the MVC namespace mapped to mvc:

<!-- resources exclusions from servlet mapping -->
<mvc:resources mapping="/css/**" location="/css/" />
<mvc:resources mapping="/images/**" location="/images/" />
<mvc:resources mapping="/js/**" location="/js/" />
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5  
Note: The Spring MVC Showcase project has moved to github. Access it here: github.com/SpringSource/spring-mvc-showcase –  WarFox Jun 20 '12 at 10:32
    
How would you do this same thing in a config using annotations? –  Jackie Mar 3 at 15:06
    

I solved by serving static content through the 'default' servlet, that just serve the content to the client. So my web.xml looks like this:

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>MyApp</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>org.springframework.web.servlet.DispatcherServlet</servlet-class>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>MyApp</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping> <!-- The 'dynamic' content -->

<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>default</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>*.css</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>default</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>*.js</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>default</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>*.jpg</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping> <!-- The 'static' content -->

Hope this helps.

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I came across this solution as well - my only problems with it are a: I don't believe it's portable and b: I had trouble mapping the "/" path via annotations. If these two could be solved, this would be the perfect solution for me. –  Rich Kroll Aug 11 '09 at 20:23
    
Sorry if i'm late answering, I was out of town. Yes probably you'r right about the portability issue. I don't have this problem because I'm stuck on tomcat. Probably u can include in the war the DefaultServlet. About the "/" path via annotation, in my configuration (method-level annotated IndexController) it works with @RequestMapping(value = "/"). With class-level annotated controllers sometimes I needed to annotate this way @RequestMapping(value = "") –  user153415 Aug 19 '09 at 22:48
    
Great solution if your running a developer instance and don't want to be bothered with setting up a Web server for static media. –  Filip Dupanović Jun 14 '11 at 10:06
    
for what it's worth, i've tried it, and this works with Tomcat 7 and Jetty 6. –  Brad Parks Aug 28 '12 at 16:46
    
This seems not to work in Glassfish 3.1.2.2(build 5). I get the following error during deployment: "There is no web component by the name of default here." Any thoughts? –  Gevorg Oct 29 '12 at 17:00

What are you using to serve your static images? If it's Apache then you could configure Apache to not pass css/js requests to your app server.

If you are using Tomcat you'd put something like this in your httpd.conf:

JkUnMount /*.css  webapp

Where 'webapp' is the entry from your workers.properties.

Sorry I can't give you a pure Spring solution, but this is how I do it.

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1  
This is a great tip, but I am looking for something portable; So when the assembled WAR is placed into a servlet container, it will work without external configuration being necessary. –  Rich Kroll Aug 5 '09 at 18:22

One way to do it would be with Filters. You'd have to write a little bit of custom code but it's not bad. Here's an example if you don't want to pass *.css or *.js files to your Spring servlet:

web.xml:

<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>fileTypeFilter</filter-name>
    <filter-class>foo.FileTypeFilter</filter-class>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</filter-mapping>

Java class:

public class FileTypeFilter implements Filter {
     public void init(FilterConfig conf) {
         // init logic here
     }

     public void destroy() {
        // release resources here
     }

     public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain chain) throws ServletException, IOException {
          if(shouldExclude(req)) {
              chain.doFilter(req, res);
              //some logic so the request doesnt go to the servlet

              //maybe you could just forward
              //the request directly to the file getting accessed.  not sure if that would work
          }

          //file should be passed to the servlet; you can do some logic here
          //if you want         
     }
     private boolean shouldExclude(ServletRequest req) {
         if(req instanceof HttpServletRequest) {
             HttpServletRequest hreq = (HttpServletRequest) req;
             return (hreq.getRequestURI().endsWith(".css") ||
                     hreq.getRequestURI().endsWith(".js"));
         }
         return false;
    }
}

I haven't tested this, but I think it will work.

EDIT: There's isn't any exclude functionality in the servlet spec. I don't think there is a good way to do this within Spring, but it essentially achieves the same thing in your post.

EDIT 2: If you want to be able to easily change what gets filtered, you could just use Spring to inject something into the Filter at runtime.

EDIT 3: I just realized if you forward directly to the file, it'll do the filter again and you'll get caught in an infinite loop. There might be another way to do this with filters, but I'm honestly not sure what it is.

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like the solution +1 –  Gurnard Feb 17 '12 at 13:10

Simplest way for me (if using a late enough version of Spring) is

<mvc:resources mapping="/**/*.js" location="/"/>
<mvc:resources mapping="/**/*.css" location="/"/>
...
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1  
I like this solution since I am adding spring to a very old site that has static content all over the place. All of the other examples I've come across don't take that into account. Thank you! –  Jason Jan 10 '13 at 15:36

Do you have a consistent extension(s) for the requests you want processed by the Spring dispatcher (I believe most of the Spring examples use a *.htm)? In that case, you could map to the extensions you wish to have processed which would bypass your css and js files.

Otherwise I'd agree with Nalandial, the Filter approach is probably the best work around at this point.

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I'm using restful urls, so there is no extension for anything in the application, so suffix mapping won't work for me. –  Rich Kroll Aug 5 '09 at 19:31

Usually, big websites prefer using another server only to handle static content. Requests of static content goes to one server and dynamic goes to another (with spring, in this case).

In many cases, Nginx server (http://nginx.com/), a recent and very fast server.

But this is not trivial to do. A lot of configurations.

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I use virtual URL path to retrieve the resource I need. Typically I use Spring MVC, so I couldn't have javascripts and css under /WEB-INF/views folder. I came up with this custom servlet to ONLY allow access to .js & .css files within /WEB-INF/views folder. In your case, if you move the /css folder and /js folder to a parent folder such as /resource then my solution will be applicable to you.

You can change the String url = "YOUR_RESOURCE_FOLDER"

So for example, virtual path can be something like http://www.mysite.com/resources/path/path/app.js

That will map to my /WEB-INF/views/path/path/app.js

web.xml

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>ResourceDispatcherServlet</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>mywebapp.web.ResourceDispatcherServlet</servlet-class>
</servlet>

<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>ResourceDispatcherServlet</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/resource/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

servlet

public class ResourceDispatcherServlet extends HttpServlet {

    public void init() throws ServletException {

    }

    public void doGet(HttpServletRequest req, HttpServletResponse rsp) throws ServletException, IOException {


        String servletPath = req.getServletPath();   // /resource
        String pathInfo = req.getPathInfo();         // /path/path/app.js

        String url = "/WEB-INF/views" + pathInfo;

        String lastPath = StringUtil.substringAfterLast(pathInfo, "/");
        String extension = StringUtil.substringAfterLast(lastPath, ".");

        try {
            RequestDispatcher dispatcher = null;
            if (!StringUtil.isEmpty(extension) && ("js".equals(extension) || "css".equals(extension))) {
                dispatcher = req.getRequestDispatcher(url);
            }

            if (dispatcher != null) {
                dispatcher.include(req, rsp);
            }
            else {
                rsp.sendError(404);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            if (!rsp.isCommitted()) {
                rsp.sendError(500);
            }
        }
    }
}
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If you are using Spring 3.0.4 and above you should use solution provided by atrain

Otherwise, you can do this simple thing:

perhaps you have following static directory structure you want to serve:

WebContent
   |
   WEB-INF
     |
    public
        |
       css
        |
       js
        |
       img

Eclipse Dynamic web projects by default generate following structure: WebContent/WEB-INF. Move the public folder out of your WEB-INF directory into WebContentdirectory.

On client side

refer your static files in following way:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="public/css/mystyles.css">

Here is my reference.

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It's cleaner to use UrlRewriteFilter to redirect the request to your servlet, here an example of urlrewrite.xml

<urlrewrite>
    <rule>
        <from>^/img/(.*)$</from>
        <to>/img/$1</to>
    </rule>
    <rule>
        <from>^/js/(.*)$</from>
        <to>/js/$1</to>
    </rule>
    <rule>
        <from>^/css/(.*)$</from>
        <to>/css/$1</to>
    </rule>
    <rule>
        <from>^/(.*)$</from>
        <to>/app/$1</to>
    </rule>
    <outbound-rule>
        <from>/app/(.*)$</from>
        <to>/$1</to>
    </outbound-rule>
</urlrewrite>

NOTES:

  • It's important the last <rule> is in the bottom so img, js, css will be caught first
  • The <outbound-rule> is optional and is just to make the existing
    <c:url value="/app/some" /> render /some instead of /app/some
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