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This is very simple code, and similar to my other question. When I click submit, the alert box shows up three times for option one, twice for two, and once for three.

Here is the part of the code where the problem is most probably located:

var chosen = ""
var len = document.ExamEntry.r1.length

for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
  if (document.ExamEntry.r1[i].checked) {
    chosen = document.ExamEntry.r1[i].value
  }
  if (chosen != "") {
    confirm(chosen)
  }
}

And here is my whole code. It all works fine except for this.

<!-- saved from url=(0055)file:///C:/Users/Bartek/Downloads/Exam%20entry4.1.2.htm -->
<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"></head><body><h1>Exam Entry Form</h1>
    <form name="ExamEntry" method="post" action="file:///C:/Users/Bartek/Downloads/success.html">
        <input type="radio" name="r1" value="GCSE">GCSE
<input type="radio" name="r1" value="AS">AS
<input type="radio" name="r1" value="A2">A2
<table width="50%" border="0">
            <tbody>
<tr>
                <td id="name" style="color: black; ">Name</td>
                <td>
                    <input type="text" name="name">
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td id="subject" style="color: black; ">Subject</td>
                <td>
                    <input type="text" name="subject">
                </td>
            </tr>
<tr>
                <td id="enumber" style="color: black; ">Examination Number</td>
                <td>
                    <input type="text" name="enumber">
                </td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>
                    <input type="submit" name="Submit" value="Submit" onclick=" return validateForm();">
                </td>
                <td>
                    <input type="reset" name="Reset" value="Reset">
                </td>
            </tr>
        </tbody></table>
    </form>

<script>
function validateForm() {
  var result = true;
  var msg = "";
  if (document.ExamEntry.name.value == "") {
    msg += "You must enter your name \n";
    document.ExamEntry.name.focus();
    document.getElementById('name').style.color = "red";
    result = false;
  }
  if (document.ExamEntry.subject.value == "") {
    msg += "You must enter the subject \n";
    document.ExamEntry.subject.focus();
    document.getElementById('subject').style.color = "red";
    result = false;
  }
  if (document.ExamEntry.enumber.value.length != 4) {
    msg += "The examination number must be exactly four characters long \n";
    document.ExamEntry.enumber.focus();
    document.getElementById('enumber').style.color = "red";
    result = false;
  }
  var chosen = ""
  var len = document.ExamEntry.r1.length

  for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if (document.ExamEntry.r1[i].checked) {
      chosen = document.ExamEntry.r1[i].value
    }
    if (chosen != "") {
      confirm(chosen)
    }
  }
  if (msg == "") {
    return result;
  } {
    alert(msg);
    return result;
  }
} 
</script>
</body>
</html>  

This is GCSE computing coursework.

share|improve this question
    
Where's the alert() coming from? I can't see that in the code. Also, please consider posting a simple live demo that reproduces your problem. –  David Thomas Sep 9 '12 at 21:12
2  
Semicolons are not optional. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Sep 9 '12 at 21:12
    
The problem is I don't know how to use most of that stuff. I don't even understand what you meant by "Semicolons are not optional." I got this code from a website. And sorry not alert, confirm. –  user1656455 Sep 9 '12 at 21:17
    
Edited/reformatted code - waiting for peer review –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 9 '12 at 21:19
1  
In Javascript, there are times where semicolons ; may be left out of the source code. In general, many people consider this a design flaw in the language and respond as if they must be there. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 9 '12 at 21:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
for (var i = 0; i <len; i++) {
if (document. ExamEntry.r1[i].checked) {
chosen = document. ExamEntry.r1[i].value
}
if (chosen != "") {
confirm(chosen)
}
}

chosen won't be "" if it was set before; you don't set it back to "" if the item wasn't checked, and so it'll confirm the last one that was. Just merge them.

for(var i = 0; i < document.ExamEntry.r1.length; i++) {
    if(document.ExamEntry.r1[i].checked) {
        confirm(document.ExamEntry.r1[i].value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
And of course it works. Thank you so much. –  user1656455 Sep 9 '12 at 21:29

You were missing an else.

if (!msg) {
    return result;
} else {
    alert(msg);
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was in the middle of reformatting his code so I could read it when I found that. You have better eyes than I. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 9 '12 at 21:16
    
I had an else before... a long time before. It worked in the same way as it did without it. –  user1656455 Sep 9 '12 at 21:23

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