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I want to generate all cardinality k subsets of {0, 1, 2, ..., n-1} in C++. In Haskell, I would do:

sets 0 n = [[]]
sets k n = [i:s | i <- [0..n-1], s <- sets (k-1) i]

Or in Python:

def sets(k, n):
    if k == 0:
        return [()]
    return ((i,)+s for i in range(n) for s in sets(k-1, i))

So, for example, (line breaks added for clarity)

ghci> sets 2 8
[[1,0],
 [2,0],[2,1],
 [3,0],[3,1],[3,2],
 [4,0],[4,1],[4,2],[4,3],
 [5,0],[5,1],[5,2],[5,3],[5,4],
 [6,0],[6,1],[6,2],[6,3],[6,4],[6,5],
 [7,0],[7,1],[7,2],[7,3],[7,4],[7,5],[7,6]]

What would be the "C++ way" of doing this? Note that I'm not asking how to solve the problem. I'm asking about what data types would be considered "normal" by C++ programmers.

(For reference, I'm vaguely familiar with C++ and somewhat familiar with C.)

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1  
Forget somewhat familiar with C. It won't help you at all. –  Puppy Sep 9 '12 at 22:23
    
I realize this is an old post, but I noticed no one suggested iterative algorithm to do this. See my note on generating all k-subsets of a n-set for description of such an algorithm and its implementation. (It turned out to be essentially the same as one of the algorithms Knuth describes in his Volume 4.) –  blazs Mar 20 at 9:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a naive, recursive approach, which implements the classical combinatorial identity:

binom(n + 1, k + 1) = binom(n, k + 1) + binom(n, k)


#include <set>

typedef std::set<int> intset;

std::set<intset> subsets(std::size_t k, intset s)
{
    if (k == 0 || s.empty() || s.size() < k) { return { { } }; }

    if (s.size() == k) { return { s }; }

    auto x = *s.begin();
    s.erase(s.begin());

    std::set<intset> result;

    for (auto & t : subsets(k - 1, s))
    {
        auto r = std::move(t);
        r.insert(x);
        result.insert(std::move(r));
    }

    for (auto & t : subsets(k, s))
    {
        results.insert(std::move(t));
    }

    return result;
}

Usage:

auto ss = subsets(3, {0, 1, 2, 3, 4});

Complete example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <prettyprint.hpp>

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    if (argc != 3) return 1;

    auto k = std::stoul(argv[1]);
    auto n = std::stoul(argv[2]);

    intset s;
    for (auto i = 0U; i != n; ++i) s.insert(i);

    std::cout << subsets(k, s) << std::endl;
}
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The concept of a set of all subsets is called the power set, and Wikipedia has quite a bit written on it. One section is even dedicated to algorithms for doing what you want. This particular problem requests the subsets of limited cardinality of the power set. You should probably use std::set.

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A quick implementation (using recursion) of this in C would be the following:

#include <stdio.h>

#define N 8
#define K 3

void print_combination(int* combination, int k)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < k; i++){
        printf("%d ", combination[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}

void find_all_combinations(int idx, int* in_use, int* combination,
        int n, int k)
{
    int i;
    if (idx == k){
        print_combination(combination, k);
        return;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < n; i++){
        if (in_use[i]){
            continue;
        }

        in_use[i] = 1;
        combination[idx++] = i + 1;

        find_all_combinations(idx, in_use, combination, n, k);

        combination[--idx] = 0;
        in_use[i] = 0;
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    /* Ensure that the arrays are initialized with zeroes. */
    int in_use[N] = {0};
    int curr_combination[K] = {0};
    find_all_combinations(0, in_use, curr_combination, N, K);

    return 0;
}
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Rosetta Code has an implementation that works by taking the first k entries of permutations of the list 0, 1, ..., n-1. It uses the C++ STL.

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