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I have an arrow on my site that I'd like if onclick, it hides one element, and shows another. Hitting it again, will hide the element that was shown and show the element that was hidden.

For example, I have

<div id="arrow"><a href="#">▾</a></div>

<div id="ad"></div>

<div id="description">Hidden</div>
<div id="nav">Also Hidden</div>

So at first, the ad is showing, and then one you've clicked the arrow, I'd like the ad to hide, and then unhide the description and nav.

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3  
Did you at least try to come up with a solution to this on your own? –  adeneo Sep 9 '12 at 21:37
    
Yes, I tried using jQuery, onclick and using functions but couldn't get it to work. –  user1658756 Sep 9 '12 at 21:38
    
Of course is possible without jQuery. elem.style.display = 'none' –  elclanrs Sep 9 '12 at 21:38
    
@elclanrs -- elem.style.display = "none" –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 9 '12 at 21:40
3  
If you tried the jQuery way and could not get it to work (assuming you tried toggle()), what makes you think using just JavaScript is going to be easier to implement? Specially that jQuery is less code and cross-browser compatible. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for just using JavaScript but if it is purely for reasons that you could not get jQuery working I think you will run into the same issues using just JavaScript. –  François Wahl Sep 9 '12 at 21:46
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With jQuery, use .toggle():

$("#arrow").click(function () {
   $("#ad, #description, #nav").toggle();
});​

DEMO.

With plain JavaScript, you need to toggle the display property of each element manually:

document.getElementById("arrow").onclick = function () {
    var description = document.getElementById("description"); 
    var nav = document.getElementById("nav"); 
    var ad = document.getElementById("ad");
    if (ad.style.display == 'none') {
      ad.style.display = '';
      nav.style.display = 'none';   
      description.style.display = 'none';
    } else {
      ad.style.display = 'none';
      nav.style.display = '';   
      description.style.display = '';
    }
};​​​​​​

DEMO.

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Why the downvote? –  João Silva Sep 9 '12 at 21:41
    
-1 The OP specifically asked "without jQuery" –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 9 '12 at 21:41
    
@JoãoSilva That works perfect. I don't mind using jQuery so looks like that's the way. Thanks! –  user1658756 Sep 9 '12 at 21:45
    
@JeremyJStarcher: The question was initially tagged with jQuery. I've updated my answer to use plain JavaScript though. Though OP has just said that he can use jQuery. –  João Silva Sep 9 '12 at 21:49
1  
+1 for JavaScript solution as well as showing jQuery solution which demonstrates the benefits quite clearly. Also, OP did say in original comments Yes, I tried using jQuery, onclick and using functions but couldn't get it to work. which would indicate that jQuery is fine but OP simply did not know how to implement it. –  François Wahl Sep 9 '12 at 22:23
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Try this (Since you asked for plain javascript)

window.onload=function(){
    var arrow=document.getElementById('arrow').getElementsByTagName('a')[0];
    arrow.onclick=function(){
        var ad=document.getElementById('ad');
        var description=document.getElementById('description');
        var nav=document.getElementById('nav');
        if(ad.style.display=='none')
        {
            ad.style.display='block';
            description.style.display='none';
            nav.style.display='none';
        }
        else
        {
            ad.style.display='none';
            description.style.display='block';
            nav.style.display='block';
        }
        return false;

    };
};

DEMO.​

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1  
+1 for just JavaScript solution. Note to OP though: That is why jQuery is so very handy. The DEMO doesn't work in IE8 for example and also, using jQuery you are replacing all that code with a few lines using toggle(). In addition toggle() remembers what display settings you had. If you had display: block then this is exactly what toggle() will set it back to when showing the element again. If it was display: inline then toggle() will set it back to that, and so on. –  François Wahl Sep 9 '12 at 21:52
    
@FrançoisWahl, Thanks and I agree with you :-) –  WereWolf - The Alpha Sep 9 '12 at 21:55
    
@FrançoisWahl, fixed for IE too and thanks again for pointing me out. –  WereWolf - The Alpha Sep 9 '12 at 22:11
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DEMO

   ​​ <input id="x" value="x" />
    <input id="y" value="y" style="visibility:hidden" />
    <input type="button" onclick="toggleBoth()" value="arrow" />​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

.

function toggle(id){

  var elem = document.getElementById(id);

    if(elem.style.visibility == 'hidden')
        elem.style.visibility = 'visible';
    else
      elem.style.visibility = 'hidden';  
}

 function toggleBoth()
    {
       toggle('x');
       toggle('y');
    }
​
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