Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When joining two tables, what are the difference between the two blocks below and which is the better approach?

Pattern A:

SELECT ...
FROM A
    INNER JOIN B
        ON A.PK = B.FK
WHERE 1=1
    AND A.Name = "Foo"
    AND B.Title = "Bar"

Pattern B:

SELECT ...
FROM A
    INNER JOIN B
        ON A.PK = B.FK
            AND B.Title = "Bar"
WHERE 1=1
    AND A.Name = "Foo"
share|improve this question
2  
I would think the query optimzier couldn't care less; but I'm no guru... –  balpha Aug 5 '09 at 16:29
    
@balpha: that is true only for INNER joins. There is a difference for OUTER joins. –  Sung Aug 6 '09 at 5:09
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This is going to differ from person to person, but I think that Pattern A is better.

What it does is it separates the table level joins from the filters. This could be helpful for queries with multiple joins and multiple filters because it clearly separates the two types of joining that is going on.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. ON was originally introduced to separate join conditions from filters. –  Powerlord Aug 5 '09 at 16:37
add comment

I prefer pattern A, but there is probably not any difference. You really have to look at the execution plan though to make sure it is running efficiently.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you replace INNER JOIN with OUTER JOIN, there will be difference.

Otherwise, these queries:

SELECT  ...
FROM    A
INNER JOIN
        B
ON      A.PK = B.FK
WHERE   A.Name = "Foo"
        AND B.Title = "Bar"

SELECT  ...
FROM    A
INNER JOIN
        B
ON      A.PK = B.FK
        AND B.Title = "Bar"
WHERE   A.Name = "Foo"

SELECT  *
FROM    A, B
WHERE   B.Title = "Bar"
        AND A.Name = "Foo"
        AND A.PK = B.FK

are identical.

Oracle, MySQL, PostgeSQL and SQL Server will treat them exactly the same, and use exactly same plan for all of them.

I'd use this one:

SELECT  ...
FROM    A
INNER JOIN
        B
ON      B.FK = A.PK
WHERE   A.Name = "Foo"
        AND B.Title = "Bar"

if there is a single-column key on B.FK, and this one:

SELECT  ...
FROM    A
INNER JOIN
        B
ON      B.FK = A.PK
        AND B.Title = "Bar"
WHERE   A.Name = "Foo"

if there is a composite key on (B.FK, B.title).

The join conditions are more visual in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
You are abosultely right about there being a differnce if you use an outer join as the first pattern wil convert the outer join to an inner join and the second will not, so results will be very different. –  HLGEM Aug 5 '09 at 16:44
add comment

I may be wrong on this, but i see the 1st approach as a more efficient one. Your queries are executed inside-out. So when you run your join first, it'll run faster just because it has to match on (probably indexed) PK & FK Fields and not anything extraneous like your Title field ( which is probably a varchar, making the match even slower). So, by the time you get to your filtering where clause, you have less data to perform matching on. Total speculation though. I wonder what others would say. Wouldn't hurt to see the execution plan on this :)

share|improve this answer
1  
When paired with a good query engine, how one writes a query should not correlate to how the query is run. This may have been true with older, less clever query engines. –  Mark Canlas Aug 5 '09 at 16:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.