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This appears to work and is valid, but is there any reason I shouldn't do this? It saves me a line of code and lets me set a variable and the value of a text area.

$('#price').val(default_price = 2.9);

It's equivalent to this:

default_price = 2.9;
$('#price').val(default_price);
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3 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

It embeds code doing one thing inside code doing something entirely different.

Particularly if you're talking about default values, "constants", etc., conflating initialization with UI interaction leads to confusion. Keep them separate–easier to find and maintain.

Technically it's the same thing. Cognitively it isn't.

o.v. raises the specter of global namespace pollution. By declaring variables in arbitrary locations you increase the odds of over-writing a value, fat-fingering an identifier, duplicating effort, and so on.

In addition to creating difficult-to-isolate bugs, this is an additional cognitive load, because you then have to understand the scope of the declared variable, locate where else it may be used, etc.

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I too vote for two-lines here. Never confuse ease of writing (one-liners) with easy of understanding or maintenance. Understanding is important of others work on your code. Keeping code easy to maintain is better for everyone. –  Gilbert Sep 9 '12 at 22:29
    
I somehow picked the habit of RTL'ing code especially when explaining something to a coworker - I'd be more concerned with global scope pollution etc. –  o.v. Sep 9 '12 at 23:25
    
hmm. thanks for the little lesson on programming theory. –  chris Sep 9 '12 at 23:33
    
@o.v. Yep, a very important concern. –  Dave Newton Sep 9 '12 at 23:34
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I'll entertain the idea such a construct could be acceptable in certain cases but not this one especially since there are other stylistic issues in the given example (the biggest one being "where does the magic number come from")

Main concern IMO is whether or not the variable has been declared - you can't simply

$('#price').val(var default_price = 2.9); //nope

and if the original code is used with the variable not yet declared, you end up polluting the global scope. However, if the variable has been declared, it brings up a follow-up question "why has it not been declared with the correct default value". Alternatively, the magic number could be different depending on an (unknown) condition:

if (/*whatever*/) {
  $('#price').val(default_price = 2.9);
} else {
  $('#price').val(default_price = 9522); //over 9000
}

Again, this is stylistically poor since setting the value of #price should have been executed outside of the conditional (or a switch statment):

if (/*whatever*/) {
  default_price = 2.9;
} else {
  default_price = 9522;
}
$('#price').val(default_price);

There could be a convoluted case where the variable setter is overridden to return something other than the value assigned which is a bit of a questionable practice in the first place IMO.

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+1, yep--definitely a major, major issue. –  Dave Newton Sep 9 '12 at 23:59
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I wouldn't use it in the manner that you are - as I would always prefer objects to store singular values as a collection, i.e:

var defaults = {
  "price" : 2.9
};

(The reason for this is that it is more exportable, more portable, and with JavaScript there is no way to properly delete a variable once it has been created - whereas you can remove as many keys from an object as you like)

However, I do use what you are doing quite a bit in if statements. There are lots of coders out there that would complain about it, but for me, assigning the result of something to a var - that you are then testing for existence - and then using within the same if block makes perfect sense, and in my eyes leads to more readable code as everything is located in the same area:

var view;

if ( (view = someClass.thatChecksAndLoads('a view')) ) {
  /// do something with the view
}

The above lends itself well to situations where you have multiple ways of getting to your view object, for example:

if ( (view = someClass.thatChecksAndLoads('a view')) ) {
  /// do something with the view
}
else if ( (view = anotherWay.toLoad('a view')) ) {
  /// do something here instead
}

As a side note - just in case anyone is wondering - I'm not just putting in extra brackets for no reason in the above. Quite a few JavaScript compilers (and ActionScript compilers too) will complain / log errors if you have a singular '=' within an if statement. All because they are trying to be helpful just incase you meant '=='... by wrapping the assignment in brackets this normally circumvents the check, or at least it stops the warnings from being issued.

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+1, interesting, but: I would almost certainly take a different approach, and associate the behavior directly with the view and/or the loading mechanism. (Or something else, depending on the context.) An if/else statement like this usually sets of warning bells in my head that I'm probably doing something wrong, and I can encapsulate the behavior in a more-communicative way. –  Dave Newton Sep 10 '12 at 0:01
    
What do you mean by "JavaScript compilers" in your last paragraph? Are you talking about IDEs or other dev tools? (Given that JS doesn't get compiled for deployment, and browsers don't - or shouldn't - object to that construct.) –  nnnnnn Sep 10 '12 at 0:06
    
@nnnnnn Apologies, JavaScript is an interpreted language (I have a certain way of being unspecific when typing)... but never-the-less many current browsers will do what is called 'JIT' or just in time compilation. The affect is the same, whatever is trying to run the code will trigger warnings and errors (just check the console in any browser). Basically, I extended my answer just to be safe in any of the EMCAScript languages really - and to defend against ppl who have a thing against brackets ;) –  pebbl Sep 10 '12 at 7:12
    
@DaveNewton - Thanks, yeah I know for many this is 'alarm bells' but I've found over 12 years of dev work that as long as other coders understand that you can do assignments in if statements (& that this isn't a mistake) - this can actually help ppl understand that there are clear choices of loading the data in question & they can see straight away where view is getting assigned. I prefer this layout to something like view = functionCall(); if(!view){view = getViewAnotherWay();}; if(view){ doSomethingWith(view);} especially when you treat the view object differently depending on it's origin –  pebbl Sep 10 '12 at 7:25
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