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I have written a function that converts a decimal number to a binary number. I enter my decimal number as a long long int. It works fine with small numbers, but my task is to determine how the computer handles overflow so when I enter (2^63) - 1 the function outputs that the decimal value is 9223372036854775808 and in binary it is equal to -954437177. When I input 2^63 which is a value a 64 bit machine can't hold, I get warnings that the integer constant is so large that it is unsigned and that the decimal constant is unsigned only in ISO C90 and the output of the decimal value is negative 2^63 and binary number is 0. I'm using gcc as a compiler. Is that outcome correct?

The code is provided below:

#include <iostream>
#include<sstream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
long long int answer;
long long dec;
string binNum;
stringstream ss;
cout<<"Enter the decimal to be converted:"<< endl;;
cin>>dec;
cout<<"The dec number is: "<<dec<<endl;
while(dec>0)
{
     answer = dec%2;
     dec=dec/2;
     ss<<answer;
     binNum=ss.str();
}
cout<<"The binary of the given number is: ";
for (int i=sizeof(binNum);i>=0;i--){
     cout<<binNum[i];}
return 0;
    }
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1  
I don't understand exactly what you're asking. What do you mean by "correct"? –  David Schwartz Sep 9 '12 at 23:01
1  
What do you mean by "how the computer handles the overflow" ? cause it doesn't "handle" it, your number simply becomes negative.. –  Cemre Sep 9 '12 at 23:07
    
i am asking whether these values that my function outputs should be/ seem correct. Those warning messages make me doubt my result –  Ivan Sep 9 '12 at 23:07
2  
Overflow will happen in your code long before dec gets near 2^63. Every time you divide dec by 2 you multiply i by 10. –  Keith Randall Sep 9 '12 at 23:32
1  
Put your binary representation into a 64-byte string, not a 32-bit integer!!! Oh, and since you set dec to -1LL, what do you expect will happen when you loop over while(dec>0)? –  paddy Sep 9 '12 at 23:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First, “on a 64-bit computer” is meaningless: long long is guaranteed at least 64 bits regardless of computer. If could press a modern C++ compiler onto a Commodore 64 or a Sinclair ZX80, or for that matter a KIM-1, a long long would still be at least 64 bits. This is a machine-independent guarantee given by the C++ standard.

Secondly, specifying a too large value is not the same as “overflow”.

The only thing that makes this question a little bit interesting is that there is a difference. And that the standard treats these two cases differently. For the case of initialization of a signed integer with an integer value a conversion is performed if necessary, with implementation-defined effect if the value cannot be represented, …

C++11 §4.7/3: “If the destination type is signed, the value is unchanged if it can be represented in the destination type (and bit-field width); otherwise, the value is implementation-defined”

while for the case of e.g. a multiplication that produces a value that cannot be represented by the argument type, the effect is undefined (e.g., might even crash) …

C++11 §5/4: “If during the evaluation of an expression, the result is not mathematically defined or not in the range of representable values for its type, the behavior is undefined.”

Regarding the code I I only discovered it after writing the above, but it does look like it will necessarily produce overflow (i.e. Undefined Behavior) for sufficiently large number. Put your digits in a vector or string. Note that you can also just use a bitset to display the binary digits.

Oh, the KIM-1. Not many are familiar with it, so here’s a photo:

KIM-1 single-board computer

It was, reportedly, very nice, in spite of the somewhat restricted keyboard.

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can you please take a look at my new code. I saved my values into a string but it only works correctly for values of up to length 5 bits so i miss one bit if i enter decimal 50 but it works correctly for smaller numbers –  Ivan Sep 10 '12 at 0:36
    
@Ivan: move the declaration of ss into the loop body, and remember that the digit needs to be inserted into the string. When that works, consider more efficient ways of converting a single binary digit to a character. Also, the code you get by doing the insertion is a nice example of needless O(n^2) behavior, but make it correct first... ;-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 10 '12 at 2:35
    
thank you for your help. I never had to user streamstring before so I had to do some research and get acquainted with it. =) It was a great learning experience. What would be some advice for a more sufficient way to do the insertion ? –  Ivan Sep 10 '12 at 2:51
    
@Ivan: oh, you can just append instead of insert in front, then at the end, when all's done, reverse the string (or vector). for a more efficient way of converting digit value to character, consider ASCII. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 10 '12 at 3:47

This adaptation of your code produces the answer you need. Your code is apt to produce the answer with the bits in the wrong order. Exhaustive testing of decimal values 123, 1234567890, 12345678901234567 show it working OK (G++ 4.7.1 on Mac OS X 10.7.4).

#include <iostream>
#include<sstream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    long long int answer;
    long long dec;
    string binNum;
    cout<<"Enter the decimal to be converted:"<< endl;;
    cin>>dec;
    cout<<"The dec number is: "<<dec<<endl;
    while(dec>0)
    {
        stringstream ss;
        answer = dec%2;
        dec=dec/2;
        ss<<answer;
        binNum.insert(0, ss.str());
//      cout << "ss<<" << ss.str() << ">>   bn<<" << binNum.c_str() << ">>" << endl;
    }
    cout<<"The binary of the given number is: " << binNum.c_str() << endl;

    return 0;
}

Test runs:

$ ./bd
Enter the decimal to be converted:
123
The dec number is: 123
The binary of the given number is: 1111011
$ ./bd
Enter the decimal to be converted:
1234567890
The dec number is: 1234567890
The binary of the given number is: 1001001100101100000001011010010
$ ./bd
Enter the decimal to be converted:
12345678901234567
The dec number is: 12345678901234567
The binary of the given number is: 101011110111000101010001011101011010110100101110000111
$ bc
bc 1.06
Copyright 1991-1994, 1997, 1998, 2000 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY.
For details type `warranty'. 
obase=2
123
1111011
1234567890
1001001100101100000001011010010
12345678901234567
101011110111000101010001011101011010110100101110000111
$

When I compile this with the largest value possible for a 64 bit machine, nothing shows up for my binary value.

$ bc 1.06
Copyright 1991-1994, 1997, 1998, 2000 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY.
For details type `warranty'. 
2^63-1
9223372036854775807
quit
$ ./bd
Enter the decimal to be converted:
9223372036854775807
The dec number is: 9223372036854775807
The binary of the given number is: 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
$

If you choose a larger value for the largest value that can be represented, all bets are off; you may get a 0 back from cin >> dec; and the code does not handle 0 properly.


Prelude

The original code in the question was:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int rem,i=1,sum=0;
    long long int dec = 9223372036854775808; // = 2^63     9223372036854775807 =  2^63-1
    cout<<"The dec number is"<<dec<<endl;
    while(dec>0)
    {
        rem=dec%2;
        sum=sum + (i*rem);
        dec=dec/2;
        i=i*10;
    }
    cout<<"The binary of the given number is:"<<sum<<endl;
    return 0;
}

I gave this analysis of the earlier code:

You are multiplying the plain int variable i by 10 for every bit position in the 64-bit number. Given that i is probably a 32-bit quantity, you are running into signed integer overflow, which is undefined behaviour. Even if i was a 128-bit quantity, it would not be big enough to handle all possible 64-bit numbers (such as 263-1) accurately.

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so when i compile this with the largest value possible for a 64 bit machine(2^63=9223372036854775808), nothing shows up for my binary value –  Ivan Sep 10 '12 at 1:48
1  
@Ivan: Note that the largest value representable in a 64-bit signed integer is 2^63-1; the most negative value is -2^63. You'd have to be using unsigned long long to get values up to 2^64-1 handled. If you use 2^63 (instead of 2^63-1), you are triggering undefined behaviour and any response is correct. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '12 at 2:04
    
thank you for your help. i appreciate it, you really helped me out a lot –  Ivan Sep 10 '12 at 2:19
    
@Jonathan: "If you use 2^63 (instead of 2^63-1), you are triggering undefined behaviour and any response is correct." is incorrect for the OP's way of providing the value. I think it's entirely random that it's correct for your different way of providing the value. See my answer (posted before yours). Also please refrain from handing out grilled fish, even that earns you rep points on SO the only reputation you get with experienced folks is one of doing people's homework for rep points. Argh. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 10 '12 at 2:31
1  
if you noticed i re-worked my code and hence he did not provide me "any grilled fish". I stored the value in a string as you suggested but I was losing bits as mentioned earlier. Johnathan just pointed me in the right direction –  Ivan Sep 10 '12 at 2:38

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