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c# create an instance of a class from a string

Hopefully this is pretty straightforward.

I'm looking to dynamically call an object based off a string representation of its name. Here is an example of what I'm looking to do:

public class Class1
{
    public string Property1 { get; set; }
    public string Property2 { get; set; }
    public string Property3 { get; set; }
}

public class Class2
{
    public string Property1 { get; set; }
    public string Property2 { get; set; }
    public string Property3 { get; set; }
}

My goal is to call Class2 from a string representation (the GetClassFromString() is obviously made up, but hopefully describes what I'm looking to do):

Object cls = Object.GetClassFromString("Class2");

Then cls would be an object from Class2.

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marked as duplicate by Chris Laplante, dtb, Alexei Levenkov, Alastair Pitts, Tim Medora Sep 9 '12 at 23:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
if (str == "Class2") return new Class2();? –  dtb Sep 9 '12 at 23:19
    
DTB, that does seem practical. Thank you. However, if I am working with something that could be calling 40+ classes dynamically. I would like to avoid having to add a new if condition for every new class that might be added in the future. Would you have any suggestion on a more dynamic way of doing it? –  Ben Record Sep 9 '12 at 23:22
    
@BenRecord: Check out the question I linked to: stackoverflow.com/questions/223952/… (yours is a duplicate of this one). That's a good solution, though a better solution is probably refactoring your application so you don't need reflection, unless you have some kind of exotic design. –  Chris Laplante Sep 9 '12 at 23:24
    
Activator.CreateInstance is what you're looking for (though be careful, you'll have to use the fully qualified name o the class Class2 can exist in different namespaces and different assemblies loaded in the appdomain. That being said, I should warn that doing this is almost certainly a bad idea. I've written apps that were dynamic to high-heaven before without having even once to rely on this. –  George Mauer Sep 9 '12 at 23:25

1 Answer 1

Have a look at the Activator.CreateInstance method.

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