Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

If I have defined this:

typedef char word[30];
typedef struct {
    int num;
    word group[30];
} paragraph;

And then in the body:

int

main(int argc, char **argv) {

    paragraph p;

    word w = "BLA";

    return 0;

}

How do I assign w in the array p and then printf w in terms of p

I know this is wrong but e.g.:

    p[][1] = w;

    printf("%s", p[][1]);

Pleas help a noob out

share|improve this question
    
Are you intentionally using a C99 and later flexible array member? Note that p is a structure, not an array. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '12 at 0:15
    
paragraph isn't a complete type. This isn't real C. It might be an extension, but in C99 you'd have to write word group[0]; I think, and then allocate a suitable amount of memory. –  Kerrek SB Sep 10 '12 at 0:17
    
I don't know :( –  tcatchy Sep 10 '12 at 0:17

2 Answers 2

Arrays are not assignable. Either initialize your array to the proper size and set each element as needed or store a pointer instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Does that means use **p=w; –  tcatchy Sep 10 '12 at 0:17
    
@FRU5TR8EDD: Yes, the type would be char**. –  Ed S. Sep 10 '12 at 0:17
    
So **p=w; I have tried that, it doesn;t work :( –  tcatchy Sep 10 '12 at 0:20
    
@FRU5TR8EDD: Yes, because "BLA" is of the type const char*, not char**. You would be well served to study the C type system a bit. –  Ed S. Sep 10 '12 at 1:10
    
@EdS. They are lvalues, though. You probably mean "modifiable lvalue". –  Jens Gustedt Sep 10 '12 at 6:22

Assuming you really intend to use the flexible array member introduced in C99, you would need to write code like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef char word[30];
typedef struct {
    int num;
    word group[];
} paragraph;

int main(void)
{
    paragraph *p = malloc(sizeof(*p) + 1 * sizeof(word));
    word w = "BLA";
    strcpy(p->group[0], w);
    printf("Word: %s\n", p->group[0]);
    free(p);
    return 0;
}

That's modestly tricky code. Avoid using flexible array members until you understand what all this is doing. Until then, make the group member of the paragraph into a word:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef char word[30];
typedef struct {
    int num;
    word group;
} paragraph;


int main(void)
{
    paragraph p;
    word w = "BLA";
    strcpy(p.group, w);
    printf("Word: %s\n", p.group);
    return 0;
}

The key point remains that you cannot directly assign arrays and need to use strcpy() or a relative with strings, and memmove() or perhaps memcpy() with other types. You can assign structures that contain arrays in general (though you can't do that with structures containing a flexible array member), but that's because you can do structure assignment and it is coincidental that the structure contains an array.


BUT for word group, if you put group[30], how does that affect the rest of the code?

Here's code that does as you ask:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef char word[30];
typedef struct
{
    int num;
    word group[30];
} paragraph;

int main(void)
{
    paragraph p;
    word w = "BLA";
    strcpy(p.group[0], w);
    printf("Word: %s\n", p.group[0]);
    return 0;
}

Under this structure, assuming sizeof(int) == 4, you would find that sizeof(paragraph) == 904 because you've declared an array of 30 words, and each word is an array of 30 characters. This structure would allow you to add multiple words to the paragraph (and most paragraphs that I write most certainly contain more than one word!). You still have to use strcpy() to copy the word from w to an element of p.group:

int main(void)
{
    paragraph p;
    word w = "BLA";
    strcpy(p.group[0], w);
    strcpy(p.group[1], "Porcupine");
    strcpy(p.group[2], "Elephant");
    p.num = 3;
    printf("Word: %s\n", p.group[0]);
    printf("Paragraph:");
    for (int i = 0; i < p.num; i++)
        printf(" %s", p.group[i]);
    putchar('\n');
    return 0;
}

While it isn't wrong to use a typedef like word, it isn't something I'd normally do. It can all too easily lead to more confusion than enlightenment. It could also lead to wasted memory if most of your words are significantly fewer than 29 characters long. (The onus is on you to ensure that you do not store words longer than 29 characters (plus the terminating null byte) in the p.group array elements.) OTOH, the overhead of memory allocation with 64-bit software could easily render the wasted space for a single word moot.

share|improve this answer
    
The 2nd one I'm beginning to understand, BUT for word group, if you put group[30], how does that affect the rest of the code. THANKS!!! :) –  tcatchy Sep 10 '12 at 0:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.