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Why isn't [1..5] == [1,2,3,4,5]?

Why isn't [1..5].to_a == [1,2,3,4,5]?

How to convert from [1..5] to [1,2,3,4,5]?

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1  
[1..5] is the same as [(1..5)] (an Array containing one Range object). The inspect isn't very helpful if this isn't understood, but try [1..5][0] on the REPL which should clear things up. –  user166390 Sep 10 '12 at 2:05
4  
Expand the range with [*1..5] –  Joshua Cheek Sep 10 '12 at 2:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

[1..5] is an array which only has one element, the range object 1..5

[1..5].to_a is still [1..5]

(1..5).to_a is [1,2,3,4,5]

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[1..5] is an array with one element - a range object, all attempts to iterate through it will fail. array can have many kinds of objects in them. In my example above I treat the range as just a range and make any array from it directly.

1.9.3-p125 :008 > (1..5).to_a  # Note regular parens.
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] 
1.9.3-p125 :009 > 

To do more closely what you stated - starting with [1..5] - you could do:

1.9.3-p125 :013 > newarray = []

1.9.3-p125 :014 > [1..5][0].each {|e| newarray << e}
 => 1..5 
1.9.3-p125 :015 > newarray
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] 
1.9.3-p125 :016 > 
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