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I am trying to printout an unsigned char value as a 2-Digit hex value, but always getting the result as 4-Digit hex values, not sure what's wrong with my code.

// unsigned char declaration
unsigned char status = 0x00;
// printing out the value 
printf("status = (0x%02X)\n\r", (status |= 0xC0));

I am expecting a 2 digit hex result as 0xC0, but I always get 0xC0FF.

As well, when I tried to print the same variable (status) as an unsigned char with the %bu format identifier I got the output as 255.

How do you get just the two hex characters as output?

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There'd be more ways of explaining what was going on if the output was 0xFFC0 (though this would be verging on compiler bug territory). What happens if you move the |= assignment into a separate statement before the printf()? If the result changes, you probably do have a compiler bug to deal with. Which version of which compiler are you using on which version of which platform (o/s)? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '12 at 2:58
    
IDE-Version: µVision V4.02 Copyright (c) Keil Elektronik GmbH / Keil Software, Inc. 1995 - 2009 Tool Version Numbers: Toolchain: PK51 Prof. Developers Kit Version: 9.01 Toolchain Path: C:\Software\Keil\C51\BIN\ C Compiler: C51.Exe V9.01 Assembler: A51.Exe V8.02 Linker/Locator: BL51.Exe V6.22 Librarian: LIB51.Exe V4.24 Hex Converter: OH51.Exe V2.6 CPU DLL: S8051.DLL V3.72 Dialog DLL: DP51.DLL V2.59 –  Asad Waheed Sep 10 '12 at 3:00
    
When I run a small program containing the code you showed, the output is status = (0xC0). Are you sure that code is exactly what's in your program? Write a small self-contained program (with #include <stdio.h> and a full definition of the main() function), and show it to us along with your output. Copy-and-paste both; don't re-type them. –  Keith Thompson Sep 10 '12 at 3:02
5  
As I understand it, Keil C generates code for the 8051 (a small CPU for embedded systems), and I don't think it fully conforms to the C standard. Your program should work correctly. I've added a "keil" tag; perhaps that will draw the attention of someone who knows more about the vagaries of the compiler you're using. –  Keith Thompson Sep 10 '12 at 3:04
    
Incidentally, your printf() format string includes \n\r. That is not the conventional order for the CRLF line ending; you'd normally write \r\n. However, that should have very little to do with the output of the number. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '12 at 3:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As far as I know, the Keil C compiler doesn't fully conform to the C standard. If so, it's likely that it doesn't quite follow the standard promotion rules for things like passing char values to variadic functions; on an 8-bit CPU, there are performance advantages in not automatically expanding 8-bit values to 16 bits or more.

As a workaround, you can explicitly truncate the high-order bits before passing the argument to printf. Try this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    unsigned char status = 0x00;
    status |= 0xC0;

    printf("status = 0x%02X\n", (unsigned int)(status & 0xFF));
    return 0;
}

Doing a bitwise "and" with 0xFF clears all but the bottom 8 bits; casting to unsigned int shouldn't be necessary, but it guarantees that the argument is actually of the type expected by printf with a "%02X" format.

You should also consult your implementation's documentation regarding any non-standard behavior for type promotions and printf.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this workaround solution. It is working correctly. –  Asad Waheed Sep 10 '12 at 3:26
2  
The & 0xFF shouldn't be necessary unless the compiler is far more broken than not implicitly converting char arguments to int. The output of 0xC0FF suggests that it is in fact not doing the conversion, and picking up the other 8 bits from trash on the stack or left over in a register. But +1 for the good catch. –  Jim Balter Sep 10 '12 at 3:41

you are sending a char to a format string which expects an int. The printf function is grabbing another byte off the stack to fill it out. Try

 printf("%02X",(int)(status|0xC0));
share|improve this answer
    
Could you tell me how to print it as hex (which expects it as unsigned char)? –  Asad Waheed Sep 10 '12 at 2:50
    
Incorrect. Since printf is a variadic function, arguments of type char or unsigned char are promoted to int (or, on some exotic systems, unsigned int). And "%02X" expects unsigned int, not int. –  Keith Thompson Sep 10 '12 at 2:50
    
unsigned char gets promoted to int because printf() is a variadic function (assuming <stdio.h> is included). If the header isn't included, then (a) it should be and (b) you don't have a prototype in scope so the unsigned char will still be promoted to int. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '12 at 2:53
    
Forgot that promotion rule... –  AShelly Sep 10 '12 at 2:54
    
And it turns out I was mostly correct, by accident. :) The error sure smelled like a caller/callee mismatch.. –  AShelly Sep 11 '12 at 20:36

Cast it to unsigned char:

printf("status = (0x%02X)\n\r", (unsigned char)(status |= 0xC0));
share|improve this answer
    
its not working...sorry! –  Asad Waheed Sep 10 '12 at 2:53
    
It have to work check here... BTW, which compiler do you use? –  Tutankhamen Sep 10 '12 at 2:59
    
If that did make a difference, it would only be because it was avoiding some compiler bug. Notice that your link gives the same result with the OP's code. (You should have tried that first.) –  Jim Balter Sep 10 '12 at 3:03
    
IDE-Version: µVision V4.02 Copyright (c) Keil Elektronik GmbH / Keil Software, Inc. 1995 - 2009 License Information: Tool Version Numbers: Toolchain: PK51 Prof. Developers Kit Version: 9.01 Toolchain Path: C:\Software\Keil\C51\BIN\ C Compiler: C51.Exe V9.01 Assembler: A51.Exe V8.02 Linker/Locator: BL51.Exe V6.22 Librarian: LIB51.Exe V4.24 Hex Converter: OH51.Exe V2.6 CPU DLL: S8051.DLL V3.72 Dialog DLL: DP51.DLL V2.59 –  Asad Waheed Sep 10 '12 at 3:04

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