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I am using John Resig's inheritance implementation for my current project, and I was wondering if there is a way for subclass to also inherit(access) parent's closure variable...

for example, I write the following class

var Foo = (function() {  
  var p = "im p";

  var Foo = Class.extend({  
    getp : function() {
       return p;
    }
  });

  return Foo;
})();

now Foo class has access to the variable p in the closure. so are Foo's subclass...

var Bar = Foo.extend({});  
var bar = new Bar;
bar.getp(); // "im p"

this is no surprise since bar.getp simply call Foo.getp, which has access to p. however if i overwrite bar.getp

var Bar = Foo.extend({
  getp : function() {
    return p;
  }
});

now when I do bar.getp(), it will throw p is undefined since it is not accessible to bar

I have several methods in mind to make p accessible to bar, but I think they are little awkward, what you think is the cleanest way to accomplish this.

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1  
Emulating classes in javascript is generally considered less than optimal. Much better to use its native functionality to best effect. –  RobG Sep 10 '12 at 3:23
    
@RobG: what not native is in prototype-based inheritance? –  zerkms Sep 10 '12 at 3:24
    
@zerkms—your comment is a bit confusing, prototypes are used to some extent in most class emulation schemes otherwise you're essentially left with closures, the point is to not use them to mimic classic inheritance purely for the sake of it. Private members, privileged methods, super, getters and setters and so on can be emulated, but better to emulate their behaviour rather than the actual feature (hope that makes sense). –  RobG Sep 10 '12 at 5:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Closure scope consists of anything that's in scope when the function is defined. In this case, p is in scope when the first getp is defined, but not when the second getp is defined. So you can't reference p. In fact, what you might have discovered is that the p referenced by the first getp method is actually universal to all Foo objects (and their sub-classes).

JavaScript doesn't really lend itself to "private variables" very well. Generally, developers end up using either closure scoped variables when inheritance is not needed or some sort of convention when inheritance is needed, such as adding an underscore, like this:

var Foo = Class.extend({  
    _p : "i'm p",
    getp : function() {
        return this._p;
    }
 });

Then you can subclass without difficulty:

var Bar = Foo.extend({  
    getp : function() {
        return this._p;
    }
});

Now, I should also note that your example is pretty contrived and is contrived in a way as to be a bit pointless. I mean, why override getp() with something that also just returns p? If your intention was to actually create a private, static property p, then what you have should work fine. If you want access to p in subclasses, you should just use the getp method that you have access to, like this:

var Bar = Foo.extend({  
    getpete : function() {
        return Foo.getp() + "ete"; 
        //You can also use this.getp() if you want, there's no difference.
    }
});

Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
    
actually p is instance of singleton class in my project, and I have bunch of them. I want a clean way to use them in Foo(the GameEngine class) and its subclass(ClientGameEngine class). The easiest way would be make those singleton class globals, I do this way just to avoid that. –  yngum Sep 10 '12 at 3:53
    
@yngum Yeah, then you should use my last example. Create the necessary getters and setters in your parent class (where you have access to the closure scope), but reference those when you are extending the class. You shouldn't need to re-create getp and setp (if it exists) in the subclass. –  Pete Sep 10 '12 at 4:05

p variable is only defined in the scope of self-executing anonymous Foo function, so there is no way to retrieve it.

Think of it as of private member, which is also only available in the class it was declared.

If you only need to retrieve it - you could do:

var Bar = Foo.extend({
  getp : function() {
    var p = Foo.prototype.getp.call(this);
    return p;
  }
});
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