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I have a code base which under XCode get the error "bad instruction" for every NEON instruction I call. It basically seems like NEON is not detected.

I am attempting to build a static library, I went to New Project, selected Cocoa Touch Static Library, then added my existing files.

Everything I'm reading indicates that NEON should be already enabled. I removed all references to armv6, and am targeting iOS 5.1

Also the code in question is all contained as routines defined in ".s" files -- pure assembly. I am not using the intrinsic method calls. this is the error which i get whenever i try to run the code:

unknown directive .fpu neon
Command /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/
XcodeDefault.xctoolchain /usr/bin/clang failed with exit code 1

also when i delete .fpu neon command from my code, it compiles and i get the .o file but then it fails to link as i still am not able to use the programs defined in the code file.

please help. thanks in advance...

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What error do you get during linking? Are you trying to link your assembly routines to an (Objective-)C or an (Objective-)C++ application? In the latter case, have you declared your asm functions as 'extern "C"' on the C++ side of things? –  fgp Sep 10 '12 at 6:49
    
hi, i am trying to link to objective-c application only –  kyuubi_2307 Sep 11 '12 at 4:39
    
Please show the precise linker error you're seeing. –  fgp Sep 27 '12 at 10:17

1 Answer 1

Try the answer on my similar question http://stackoverflow.com/a/10507325/571778

Sort answer, in my case, was I was porting assembly from another compiler. A few points:

  • Xcode requires all lower case instructions
  • The pseudo-ops are different (try http://www.shervinemami.info/armAssembly.html#template)
  • you must start your assembly function names with "_", because that's how the linker finds them (in C, call "foo()", but in ASM name your function "_foo")
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