Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wondering how or/and works?

For example if I want to get all rows where display = 1

I can just do WHERE tablename.display = 1

and if I want all rows where display = 1 or 2

I can just do WHERE tablename.display = 1 or tablename.display = 2

But what if I want to get all rows where display = 1 or 2 and where any of the content, tags, or title contains hello world

How would the logic play out for that?

Select * from tablename 
where display = 1 or display = 2 and content like "%hello world%" or tags like "%hello world%" or title = "%hello world%"

Would be my guess. but then I can read that in several ways.

Does it read out as:

 (display = 1 or display = 2) and (content like "%hello world%" or tags like "%hello world%" or title = "%hello world%")

or as

((display = 1 or display = 2) and (content like "%hello world%")) or (tags like "%hello world%" or title = "%hello world%")

etc.

share|improve this question
1  
    
These things are taught during your early C/C++ classes. –  Salman A Sep 10 '12 at 5:31
    
Then I guess I should sign up for an entire C/C++ course just to learn the operator precedence :/ –  Hailwood Sep 10 '12 at 6:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The MySQL documentation has a good page with information on which operators take precedence.

From that page,

12.3.1. Operator Precedence

Operator precedences are shown in the following list, from highest precedence to the lowest. Operators that are shown together on a line have the same precedence.

INTERVAL
BINARY, COLLATE
!
- (unary minus), ~ (unary bit inversion)
^
*, /, DIV, %, MOD
-, +
<<, >>
&
|
= (comparison), <=>, >=, >, <=, <, <>, !=, IS, LIKE, REGEXP, IN
BETWEEN, CASE, WHEN, THEN, ELSE
NOT
&&, AND
XOR
||, OR
= (assignment), :=

So your original query

Select
    *
from tablename 
where
    display = 1
    or display = 2
    and content like "%hello world%"
    or tags like "%hello world%"
    or title = "%hello world%"

would be interpreted as

Select
    *
from tablename 
where 
    (display = 1)
    or (
        (display = 2)
        and (content like "%hello world%")
    )
    or (tags like "%hello world%")
    or (title = "%hello world%")

When in doubt, use parenthesis to make your intent clear. While the information on the MySQL page is helpful, it may not be immediately obvious if the query is ever revisited.

You might consider something like the following. Note that I've changed the title = "%hello world%" to title like "%hello world%", since that fits better with the goal you've described.

Select
    *
from tablename 
where
    (
        (display = 1)
        or (display = 2)
    ) and (
        (content like "%hello world%")
        or (tags like "%hello world%")
        or (title like "%hello world%")
    )
share|improve this answer

You need to use brackets for your multiple OR conditions. And for display = 1 OR display = 2 you can use display IN(1,2). Try this:

SELECT * FROM tableName
WHERE display IN (1,2)
AND (content LIKE "%hello world%" 
OR tags LIKE "%hello world%" 
OR title LIKE "%hello world%")

For more info look at MySQL: Operator Precedence

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, that wouldn't work as expected –  zerkms Sep 10 '12 at 5:05
    
@zerkms Now see. –  hims056 Sep 10 '12 at 5:05

in all SQL servers, AND takes precedence over OR, so just remember to put brackets around your ORs:

select * from tablename 
where (display = 1 or display = 2)
 and (content like "%hello world%" 
      or tags like "%hello world%" 
      or title = "%hello world%")


btw (display = 1 or display = 2) is equivalent to display in (1, 2).

share|improve this answer
    
Please see my addition to my question. it's in relation to not having brackets how does it play out? –  Hailwood Sep 10 '12 at 5:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.