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I am designing an asynchronous logger class as follows. However, not sure if I am using the boost condition variable in the right way. Can anyone comment on this? Here the processLogEntry method is a thread function and I am using boost here.

void LogWriter::stopThread()
{
    mStop = true;
    mCond.notify_one();
    mThread->join();
}   

void LogWriter::processLogEntry()
{
    while(!mStop)
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mMutex);
        mCond.wait(lock);
        while(!q.empty())
        {
            // process begins
        }
    }
}

void LogWriter::addLogEntry()
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mMutex);
    // add it in the queue
    mCond.notify_one();
}
share|improve this question
    
one obvious problem in your code is that mStop suffers from race condition, which can be amended by using atomic<> variable. Also please also update your code with how you push logs to the queue (I guess?) q, to let us better understand your problem. –  user2k5 Sep 10 '12 at 5:55
    
I am using volatile bool for mStop. Even then it will be a problem? –  user243655 Sep 10 '12 at 5:58
    
mStop does not suffer from a race condition since it is only modified by stopThread, and stopThread waits that the thread finishes before returning. –  sylvain.joyeux Sep 10 '12 at 5:58
    
@sylvain.joyeux His code using mStop is undefined behavior, since the variable is accessed by more than one thread. It must be either an atomic variable, or the accesses must be synchronized. –  James Kanze Sep 10 '12 at 8:31
    
mStop is a true/false variable which is written only by one thread and read only by one thread. The thread that reads the variable can only see a transition from false to true since the thread that sets the condition to true joins. This is not undefined behaviour. –  sylvain.joyeux Sep 10 '12 at 11:43
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As it has been pointed out, you must either make mStop atomic or guard all its accesses with the mutex. Forget about volatile, it's not relevant to your purposes.

Furthermore, when waiting on a condition variable a call to wait may return even if no notification functions were called (those are so-called spurious wake-ups). As such, calls to wait need to be guarded.

void LogWriter::stopThread()
{
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mMutex);
        mStop = true;
        mCond.notify_one();
    }
    mThread->join();

}   

void LogWriter::processLogEntry()
{
    for(;;) {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mMutex);
        // We wait as long as we're not told to stop and
        // we don't have items to process
        while(!mStop && q.empty()) mCond.wait(lock);

        // Invariant: if we get here then
        // mStop || !q.empty() holds

        while(!q.empty())
        {
            // process begins
        }

        if(mStop) return;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. could you let me know how to make mStop atomic? does boost has some data type of that kind? –  user243655 Sep 10 '12 at 7:01
    
@user243655 I don't know of a portable C++03 solution. (IIRC there is a Boost.Atomic library under review.) So you may want to check what's available on your system. –  Luc Danton Sep 10 '12 at 7:23
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