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Based on this code, how do I get the UTC offset of a given date by seconds. get UTC offset from time zone name in python

Currently, I have this code:

Python 2.7.3 (default, Jul  3 2012, 19:58:39) 
[GCC 4.7.1] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import pytz
>>> import datetime
>>> offset = datetime.datetime.now(pytz.timezone('US/Pacific')).strftime('%z')
>>> offset
'-0700'
>>> int(offset)*3600
-2520000
>>> int(offset)*360 
-252000
>>> 

For example, US/Pacific sometimes is -800 hours (probably military time :D) but I need it to be in seconds, ex: -25200.

Shall I just multiply it by 360? Doesn't sound right but who knows.

TIA

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted
>>> import datetime, pytz
>>> melbourne = pytz.timezone("Australia/Melbourne")
>>> melbourne.utcoffset(datetime.datetime.now())
datetime.timedelta(0, 36000)

>>> pacific = pytz.timezone("US/Pacific")
>>> pacific.utcoffset(datetime.datetime.now())
datetime.timedelta(-1, 61200)
>>> -1*86400+61200
-25200
>>> pacific.utcoffset(datetime.datetime.now()).total_seconds()
-25200.0
share|improve this answer
    
won't .total_seconds() help here? :-) –  Martijn Pieters Sep 10 '12 at 6:24
    
@MartijnPieters, yep, especially if the offset has a fractional number of seconds :) –  gnibbler Sep 10 '12 at 6:26
    
Ach, call int() on it and be done with it; timedeltas can deal with milliseconds and .total_seconds() reflects that. :-P –  Martijn Pieters Sep 10 '12 at 6:28
    
total_seconds() is what I need, thanks everyone. –  Lysender Sep 10 '12 at 6:49

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