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Following code gives me warning at compile time: Warning: use of operator '>' has no effect

rd(a,{x,y}),
List = [#a{x=1,y=2}, #a{x=3,y=4}],
lists:filter(
    fun(E) ->
        E#a.x > 1, E#a.y =:= 2
    end, List).

But when I substitute comma with andalso, there is no warning.

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Using comma in this case only separates two actions, without effect to each other: E#a.x > 1 and the next operation (which is result of function) E#a.y =:= 2

It means that in your case, filter function is equal to:

fun( E ) ->
   E#a.y =:= 2
end

Only if you're writing guard expressions usage of comma is equal to usage of andalso, otherwise - comma just a separator between actions.

So, you may rewrite your function in two ways:

1)

fun
(E) when E#a.x > 1, E#a.y =:= 2 ->
   true;
(_Othervise) ->
   false
end

2)

 fun( E ) ->
    (E#a.x > 1) andalso (E#a.y =:= 2)
 end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Fully understand. – goofansu Sep 10 '12 at 8:11
    
Yes, in the body , just separates actions and gives them an order to be evaluated. The compiler is telling you that E#a.x > 2 has no side effects, will never generate an exception and its return value is ignored so it will never affect execution. – rvirding Sep 10 '12 at 9:54

Yes, it is as @stemm has said.

In the body , just separates actions and gives them an order to be evaluated. The compiler is telling you that as E#a.x > 2 has no side effects, will never generate an exception and its return value is ignored then it will never affect execution.

In a guard, however, , separates guard tests which all have to succeed for the the guard to succeed.

Be careful about viewing guards as normal expressions they do behave differently, as here for example. Guards also behave differently on errors. So while guards look like expressions they are really tests.

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