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I am trying to connect to internet where I have to fetch data, if the time exceeds more than 5 secs to connect I have to finish the process & continue to work offline.
Everything is working fine, sometimes it takes around 10secs to return when internet is not available, Now I have to return the xml == null; when the time exceeds more than time limit,
I don't want to do this in Async Task

    public String getUrlData(String url) {
    String xml = null;

    DefaultHttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient();
    HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost(url);
    System.out.println("waiting");
    HttpResponse httpResponse;

    try {
        // start the timer here

        httpResponse = httpClient.execute(httpPost);
        HttpEntity httpEntity = httpResponse.getEntity();
        xml = EntityUtils.toString(httpEntity);

        // check if the timer has exceeded by "if else"
        // move to "return xml;" Manually when exceeds 5sec, but how?

    } catch (ClientProtocolException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return xml;

}

Edited Code after this answer

public String getUrlData(String url) {
    String xml = null;

    final int TIMEOUT_MILLISEC = 5000; // 5 seconds

    HttpParams httpParams = new BasicHttpParams();
    HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);
    HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);

    DefaultHttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient(httpParams);
    HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost(url);
    System.out.println("waiting");
    HttpResponse httpResponse;

    try {
        // start the timer here
        System.out.println("Started");
        httpResponse = httpClient.execute(httpPost);
        HttpEntity httpEntity = httpResponse.getEntity();
        xml = EntityUtils.toString(httpEntity);

    } catch (ClientProtocolException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    System.out.println("Ended");
    return xml;

}

LogCat Here >> 20 Secs

share|improve this question
    
Did you try this on a real device or on the emulator? While experimenting with the DefaultHttpClient I noticed that setting a timeout doesn't work properly in the emulator. It basically just ignores any timeout setting (see also this post) –  THelper Sep 13 '12 at 12:44
    
But, my requirement is not that, I need something to skip my execution of HTTP request after 5secs & return the xml as null. If the xml is returned before 5sec then nothing should happen. –  VenomVendor Sep 13 '12 at 13:59
1  
If you set a timeout as suggested by Waqas your http-request will automatically be stopped after the timeout interval and an error will be thrown. All you have to do is catch the error an return null. My point is that this will only work on real devices and not in the emulator. –  THelper Sep 13 '12 at 14:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+50

All you need to do is to define a timeout limit for your connections. For example:

final int TIMEOUT_MILLISEC = 5000;  // 5 seconds

HttpParams httpParams = new BasicHttpParams();
HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);
HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);

HttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient(httpParams);

and afterwards, use httpClient in the same way you are using it.


Edit

public String getUrlData(String url) {
String xml = null;

final int TIMEOUT_MILLISEC = 5000;  // 5 seconds

HttpParams httpParams = new BasicHttpParams();
HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);
HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);

DefaultHttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient(httpParams);
HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost(url);
System.out.println("waiting");
HttpResponse httpResponse;

try {
    // start the timer here

    httpResponse = httpClient.execute(httpPost);
    HttpEntity httpEntity = httpResponse.getEntity();
    xml = EntityUtils.toString(httpEntity);

    // check if the timer has exceeded by "if else"
    // move to "return xml;" Manually when exceeds 5sec, but how?

} catch (ClientProtocolException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IOException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}
return xml;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Am new to java, can you modify the code? –  VenomVendor Sep 10 '12 at 8:21
    
see my edited answer –  waqaslam Sep 10 '12 at 8:25
    
Thanks dude, but this doesn't seem to work plz check the LogCat Here. Also check my Updated Code which I am Currently Using. –  VenomVendor Sep 12 '12 at 9:19
    
ahaan the famous java.net.UnknownHostException :) Simply close and run again your emulator (perhaps eclipse too) then clean your project and build again –  waqaslam Sep 12 '12 at 10:12
1  
What you are doing right now will do pretty much what you want. However, if you want then simply add a single catch block (catch(Exception ex){ /* do nothing */ }) which will do nothing but will silently eat all types of exceptions and return null –  waqaslam Sep 13 '12 at 9:08

How about this:

Thread thread = new Thread() {
  @Override
  public void run() {
    // do the downloading thing..
  }
};
thread.start();
thread.join(5000);
share|improve this answer
    
Sound similar to my answer –  zyngawow Sep 10 '12 at 8:11
    
The question says "don't want to do this in Async Task". This is like AsyncTask. AsyncTask is a wrapper over a thread. –  gammay Sep 10 '12 at 8:53
    
join() makes it synchronous –  yegor256 Sep 10 '12 at 9:00
    
This also suffers from the fact that you might not be able to cancel the running code. Ideally, you'd just do a thread.interrupt if the join comes back and the thread is still alive. However, thread.interrupt() is a cooperate effort and the underlying Runnable code needs to be coded to deal with it. Some operations like Thread.sleep do this for you and throw an InterruptedException. Others like java.io streams don't and you explicitly have to keep checking Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted. It's much safer to set the socket timeout as others have suggested. –  Matt Sep 10 '12 at 17:35

This is just an idea, but you could set up a delayed runnable and check after 5 seconds if the file has any size.

share|improve this answer
 HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();

    // Turn off stale checking.  Our connections break all the time anyway,
    // and it's not worth it to pay the penalty of checking every time.
    HttpConnectionParams.setStaleCheckingEnabled(params, false);

    HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(params, SOCKET_OPERATION_TIMEOUT);
    HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(params, SOCKET_OPERATION_TIMEOUT);
    HttpConnectionParams.setSocketBufferSize(params, 8192);

    // Don't handle redirects -- return them to the caller.  Our code
    // often wants to re-POST after a redirect, which we must do ourselves.
    HttpClientParams.setRedirecting(params, false);

    // Use a session cache for SSL sockets
    SSLSessionCache sessionCache = context == null ? null : new SSLSessionCache(context);

    // Set the specified user agent and register standard protocols.
    HttpProtocolParams.setUserAgent(params, userAgent);
    SchemeRegistry schemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry();
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("http",
            PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory(), 80));
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("https",
            SSLCertificateSocketFactory.getHttpSocketFactory(
            SOCKET_OPERATION_TIMEOUT, sessionCache), 443));

    ClientConnectionManager manager =
            new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(params, schemeRegistry);

    // We use a factory method to modify superclass initialization
    // parameters without the funny call-a-static-method dance.
    return new AndroidHttpClient(manager, params);

Change SOCKET_OPERATION_TIMEOUT value according to your need.

share|improve this answer

This code may help you

this code from last answer is Ok

final int TIMEOUT_MILLISEC = 5000;  // 5 seconds

HttpParams httpParams = new BasicHttpParams();
HttpConnectionParams.setConnectionTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);
HttpConnectionParams.setSoTimeout(httpParams, TIMEOUT_MILLISEC);

HttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient(httpParams);

Only when you are trying to execute your request you have to care about 3 more exceptions SocketTimeoutException, UnknownHostException, ConnectTimeoutException

so catch this 3 exceptions also.

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