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Possible Duplicate:
Default constructor with empty brackets
Instantiate class with or without parentheses?

Program:

class Foo
{
   public:
      Foo ( int bar = 1 )
      {
         cout << "bar=" << bar;
      }
};

int main() {

   cout << "0 - ";
   Foo foo_0 ( 0 ) ;
   cout << '\n';

   cout << "1 - ";
   Foo foo_1 ();
   cout << '\n';

   cout << "2 - ";
   Foo foo_4;
   cout << '\n';

   return 0;

}

Output:

0 - bar=0
1 - 
2 - bar=1

Question: why example #1 does not works, while examples #0 and #2 do?

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marked as duplicate by jogojapan, Kerrek SB, EvilTeach, Bo Persson, BЈовић Jan 28 '13 at 13:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
1? 2? 1 and 2? I'm confused. –  Kerrek SB Sep 10 '12 at 9:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted
Foo foo_1 ();

is a function declaration, no object is created. It's a function called foo_1 that takes no parameters and returns a Foo object.

The correct way to construct an object there is

Foo foo1;

This concept is called C++'s vexing parse. A short description is that anything that can be treated as a declaration, is.

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thanks! Comprehensive answer as usual! –  Kolyunya Sep 10 '12 at 8:55
    
btw, exmaple #0 is correct too, right? –  Kolyunya Sep 10 '12 at 8:56
    
@Kolyunya yes.. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 10 '12 at 8:57

foo_1(); in other words it's known as Null Intialize you must know difference between the object creation and value intialization.

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This is wrong.. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 10 '12 at 9:36

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