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In order to calculate the highest contribution of a row per ID I have a beautiful script which works when the IDs are a numeric. Today however I found out that it is also possible that IDs can have characters (for instance ABC10101). For the function to work, the dataset is converted to a matrix. However data.matrix(df) does not support characters. Can the code be altered in order for the function to work with all kinds of IDs (character, numeric, etc.)? Currently I wrote a quick workaround which converts IDs to numeric when ID=character, but that will slow the process down for large datasets.

Example with code (function: extract the first entry with the highest contribution, so if 2 entries have the same contribution it selects the first):

Note: in this example ID is interpreted as a factor and data.matrix() converts it to a numeric value. In the code below the type of the ID column should be character and the output should be as shown at the bottom. Order IDs must remain the same.

tc <- textConnection('
    ID   contribution   uniqID      
   ABCUD022221       40           101  
   ABCUD022221       40           102 
   ABCUD022222       20           103
   ABCUD022222       10           104
   ABCUD022222       90           105
   ABCUD022223       75           106
   ABCUD022223       15           107
   ABCUD022223       10           108        ')

df <- read.table(tc,header=TRUE)

#Function that needs to be altered
uniqueMaxContr <- function(m, ID = 1, contribution = 2) {
  t(
    vapply(
           split(1:nrow(m), m[,ID]), 
           function(i, x, contribution) x[i, , drop=FALSE]
           [which.max(x[i,contribution]),], m[1,], x=m, contribution=contribution
          )
  )
}

df<-data.matrix(df) #only works when ID is numeric
highestdf<-uniqueMaxContr(df)
highestdf<-as.data.frame(highestdf)

In this case the outcome should be:

    ID   contribution   uniqID      
   ABCUD022221       40           101  
   ABCUD022222       90           105
   ABCUD022223       75           106
share|improve this question
    
Why do you need data.matrix? Purely for size constraints? If that's true, I feel "Mr. data.table solution" is lurking in the shadows. @mnel? :) –  Roman Luštrik Sep 10 '12 at 9:35
    
I don't really have any constraints, so data.table is an option. –  Max van der Heijden Sep 10 '12 at 9:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Others might be able to make it more concise, but this is my attempt at a data.table solution:

tc <- textConnection('
    ID   contribution   uniqID      
   ABCUD022221       40           101  
   ABCUD022221       40           102 
   ABCUD022222       20           103
   ABCUD022222       10           104
   ABCUD022222       90           105
   ABCUD022223       75           106
   ABCUD022223       15           107
   ABCUD022223       10           108        ')

df <- read.table(tc,header=TRUE)

library(data.table)
dt <- as.data.table(df)
setkey(dt,uniqID)

dt2 <- dt[,list(contribution=max(contribution)),by=ID]

setkeyv(dt2,c("ID","contribution"))
setkeyv(dt,c("ID","contribution"))

dt[dt2,mult="first"]

##               ID contribution uniqID
## [1,] ABCUD022221           40    101
## [2,] ABCUD022222           90    105
## [3,] ABCUD022223           75    106

EDIT -- more concise solution

  • You can use .SD which is the subset of the data.table for the grouping, and then use which.max to extract a single row.

in one line

dt[,.SD[which.max(contribution)],by=ID]

##               ID contribution uniqID
## [1,] ABCUD022221           40    101
## [2,] ABCUD022222           90    105
## [3,] ABCUD022223           75    106
share|improve this answer
2  
Made it a bit more concise. -- no need for the merging. –  mnel Sep 10 '12 at 11:44
    
data.table is so powerful, but it really needs a syntactical front end. –  Roland Sep 10 '12 at 11:59
    
Spend enough time with it, and it starts to make sense. Read @MatthewDowle's answers and edits on SO -- that is how I learn! –  mnel Sep 10 '12 at 12:01
    
I know it's possible to learn data.table like that and that's what I am doing, but it's not optimal that you need to spend so much effort. The threshold for beginners is pretty high. –  Roland Sep 10 '12 at 12:07
    
This works perfectly guys. Thank you very much!! –  Max van der Heijden Sep 10 '12 at 12:44

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