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For example, the call hierarchy is methodA->methodB->methodC->methodD.

In methodD, an checked exception is thrown. In methodB, the exception is caught.

So my question is, when I read code and see an exception is thrown. Is there a quick way to locate the code where the exception is caught?

BTW, the context is I am re-structure all exceptions in an app. So I am thinking of how to get higher efficiency.

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I can't make sense of what you are trying to do. Method B is catching the exception, and Method B wants to know which method is catching the exception? –  JimN Sep 11 '12 at 3:13
    
I mean when I read code and see an exception is thrown. Is there a quick way to locate the code where the exception is caught? –  Smartmarkey Sep 11 '12 at 6:02
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2 Answers

You need to look at the call hierarchy in your IDE and step back from methodD to the top to find where the Exception is caught.

Or you can breakpoint where the exception is thrown in your debugger and step to the next line. ;)

Or you can print the stack trace and select each of the lines in your IDE to look at the code the stack trace referes to and see if it would catch you exception.

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The context is I am re-structure all exceptions in an app. So I am thinking of how to get higher efficiency. –  Smartmarkey Sep 11 '12 at 2:25
    
If you want to improve performance, I suggest you use a CPU profiler. If your exceptions are causing a performance problem they will show up as an issue (with the call hierarchy) if not, you don't need to change them. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 11 '12 at 7:09
    
No. The purpose is to make all exceptions in the app into an organized and unified way. It is messy now. –  Smartmarkey Sep 11 '12 at 8:29
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If I understand you correctly, you are catching and logging exceptions somewhere, and you want to see (in the log) which class/method threw the exception. Here are a few ideas:

  1. Modify the code which logs the exception to explicitly include the name of the method which caught the exception.
  2. Modify your logger so that it captures and reports the context (the calling class and file/line number) of the code which logged the exception. The call stack can be used for this purpose.

Option #2 is more complicated, but definitely more efficient for a larger codebase.

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