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Just a really quick question here. I'm using virtual functions to read in from a text file. Now, it's virtual because in one aspect I want the values to be normalised, and, in the other respect I don't want them to be normalised. I have tried to do this:

bool readwav(string theFile, 'native');

So in theory, if the 'native' is used, this method should be called, however, if 'double' is called then a different version of the method is called. Same for if the value is empty, it should just perform the native option.

First question, why doesn't the declaration above work? Also, is this the best route to go down? Or, would it be better to have just one class method that switches between the options.

Thanks :)

Update:

Where am I going wrong?

bool Wav::readwav(string theFile, ReadType type = NATIVE)
{
// Attempt to open the .wav file
ifstream file (theFile.c_str());

if(!this->readHeader(file))
{
    cerr << "Cannot read header file";
    return 0;
}

for(unsigned i=0; (i < this->dataSize); i++)
{
    float c = (unsigned)(unsigned char)data[i];

    this->rawData.push_back(c);
}

return true;
}

bool Wav::readwav(string theFile, ReadType type = DOUBLE)
{
  // Attempt to open the .wav file
  ifstream file (theFile.c_str());

  cout << "This is the double information";
  return true;
 }
share|improve this question
    
suggest: larger code sample –  justin Sep 10 '12 at 9:35
1  
"Or, would it be better to have just one class method that switches between the options" - this. C++ is not functional programming language with pattern-matching ;) –  wasyl Sep 10 '12 at 9:35
    
1) What is 'native'? In c++ an argument declaration should have a type. 2) Why should parameter value affect virtual function being called? It's affected by the actual type of this only. –  Igor R. Sep 10 '12 at 9:39
    
@Phorce - You're misunderstanding the default parameter I mentioned in my answer. This only appears in the function declaration, not the definition as you have here. It means that if you don't provide a ReadType argument, it will default to NATIVE. –  Aesthete Sep 10 '12 at 10:03
    
@Aesthete I'm really confused. Using the enum, how do I differentiate between native and double? In a sense that, I don't want it always to be native, I want it to be double aha! –  Phorce Sep 10 '12 at 10:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sounds like what you want is an enumeration with a default parameter.

enum FileType
{
  NATIVE=0,
  DOUBLE      
};

bool readwav(string theFile, FileType type = NATIVE);

Default parameters are present in the function declaration, do not put them in the definition.

bool readwav(string theFile, FileType type)
{
  switch(type)
  {
    case NATIVE: { ... } break;
    case DOUBLE: { ... } break;
    default: { ... } break;
  }
}

This way, calling readwav without a parameter will use the NATIVE type by default.

readwav("myfile.wav"); // Uses NATIVE type
readwav("myfile.wav", NATIVE); // Also uses NATIVE
readwav("myfile.wav", DOUBLE); // Uses DOUBLE type
share|improve this answer
    
in my .cpp function implementation, I need to switch "type" incase it's native or double? –  Phorce Sep 10 '12 at 10:12
1  
Yep. see the changes. –  Aesthete Sep 10 '12 at 10:15
    
Gotcha now :) But it would be "0" or "1", right? 0 = native 1 = double! Thank you so much! Sorry I've been a pain haha –  Phorce Sep 10 '12 at 10:17
1  
It's all good man, I'm glad it works. Make sure you take into account all the answers here, they are all right. But no, you just use the enumeration like NATIVE, you don't have switch by the associated numbers, it's all done for you at compile time. –  Aesthete Sep 10 '12 at 10:19

Because 'native' is a multi-char character, not a string. I'd go with multiple versions of the function though:

bool readwavNative(string theFile);
bool readwavDouble(string theFile);

or at least an enum as the second parameter:

enum ReadType
{
   ReadNative,
   ReadDouble
};

//...
bool readwav(string theFile, ReadType type);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, I'm confused about the enum and the function in my .cpp file, can I still declare multiple functions etc..? –  Phorce Sep 10 '12 at 9:38
    
all caps is usually reserved for macros. –  Puppy Sep 10 '12 at 9:38
    
@Phorce did you have multiple functions in your original code? –  Luchian Grigore Sep 10 '12 at 9:39
2  
I always use capitals for enumerations, and haven't met many people who don't. –  Aesthete Sep 10 '12 at 9:42
1  
@Phorce you're defining the same function twice. It should be just one bool Wav::readwav(string theFile, ReadType type) and have an if inside - if ( type == ReadDouble )... else if (type == ReadNative) .... –  Luchian Grigore Sep 10 '12 at 9:54

The question has oop in it so I would assume an oop answer is wanted. I think a strategy patter would suit your purpose.

class WavReader
{
public:
    WavReader(const std::string fileName)
    {
        //open file and prepare to read
    }

    virtual ~WavReader()
    {
        //close file
    }

    virtual bool read()=0;
};

class NativeWavReader: public WavReader
{
public:
    NativeWavReader(const std::string fileName): WavReader(fileName){}

    virtual bool read()
    {
        //native reading method
        std::cout<<"reading\n";
        return true;
    }
};

NativeWavReader implements the read method from the strategy WavReader, if you want another method you create a class OtherWavReader reading the file differently.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks for the reply. I don't really want to implement another class to read in the file, just simply have a virtual function that changes depending on if 'Native' or 'Double' is implemented. :) –  Phorce Sep 10 '12 at 9:52
1  
@Phorce In that case I miss-understood the question. Then I would follow Luchian Grigore's suggestion. –  denahiro Sep 10 '12 at 9:58
    
@Phorce - I don't think you quite understand the purpose of virtual functions. Virtual methods without multiple classes are useless. –  Aesthete Sep 10 '12 at 10:11
    
@Aesthete I do have multiple classes, just, I don't want a separate class for parsing the data :)! –  Phorce Sep 10 '12 at 10:12
1  
@Phorce I don't know what other classes you have but you could connect them to the reading strategy by using a bridge pattern. I'm sorry that I'm that fussy but function switching feels just so non-oop. –  denahiro Sep 10 '12 at 10:19

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