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why is this not OK?

void func(const char* &pointer){...}


//in main
const char* mainPointer = "a word";
func(mainPointer);

my intention is to send a pointer to a function, that changes it(the pointer) but doesn't change the chars it is pointing to.

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5  
That should work - ideone.com/93Zuo and it's OK to use. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 10 '12 at 9:41
1  
Are you potentially compiling as C and not C++ ? –  themel Sep 10 '12 at 9:44
    
no.I'm compilimg in c++. the error I get it: cannot convert parameter 1 from 'const char *' to 'const char *&' –  kakush Sep 10 '12 at 9:47
    
@kakush: show your complete program. In the error message, I think the compiler is saying that you're supplying an rvalue expression of type const char*, not just the name of a variable. –  Steve Jessop Sep 10 '12 at 9:47
5  
@kakush: you can't take a reference to mainPointer+1. It's a value resulting from a computation, and it doesn't necessarily have an address in memory. Even if you could modify it, you wouldn't be modifying mainPointer, which is what you expected, you'd be modifying some pointer containing the value of mainPointer+1. So the C++ standard forbids a normal & reference from binding to an rvalue. –  Steve Jessop Sep 10 '12 at 9:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following code (MS Visual C++ 2010) shows that it is perfectly possible and works. The output is: "World!"

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


void func(const char*& ptr) 
{
    ptr += 6;
}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    const char* Ptr = "Hello World!";
    func(Ptr);
    cout << Ptr << endl;
    return 0;
}

Note that in contrast to Null Voids code, we do modify the pointer within func here.

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It is perfectly OK. Infact it works like a charm.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std ;



void func(const char* &pointer)
{
  cout<<" \n "<<pointer<<"\n";
}


int main()
{
    const char* mainPointer = "a word";
    func(mainPointer);

    cout<<" \nPress any key to continue\n";
    cin.ignore();
    cin.get();

return 0;
}

Program output:

 a word

Press any key to continue

Compile output:

Compiling...
this.cpp
Linking...

this.exe - 0 error(s), 0 warning(s)
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Reading the question, I guess you should change the pointer within func to demonstrate the point. –  Kit Fisto Sep 10 '12 at 13:10

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