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I noticed you can indeed use the continue keyword in a switch statement, but on PHP it doesn't do what I expected.

If it fails with PHP, who knows how many other languages it fails too? If I switch between languages a lot, this can be a problem if the code doesn't behave like I expect it to behave.

Should I just avoid using continue in a switch statement then?

PHP (5.2.17) fails:

for($p = 0; $p < 8; $p++){
    switch($p){
        case 5:
            print"($p)";
            continue;
            print"*"; // just for testing...
        break;
        case 6:
            print"($p)";
            continue;
            print"*";
        break;
    }
    print"$p\r\n";
}
/*
Output:
0
1
2
3
4
(5)5
(6)6
7
*/

C++ seems to work as expected (jumps to end of for loop):

for(int p = 0; p < 8; p++){
    switch(p){
        case 5:
            cout << "(" << p << ")";
            continue;
            cout << "*"; // just for testing...
        break;
        case 6:
            cout << "(" << p << ")";
            continue;
            cout << "*";
        break;
    }
    cout << p << "\r\n";
}
/*
Output:
0
1
2
3
4
(5)(6)7
*/
share|improve this question
    
end of the loop? I wouldn't necessarily call switch a loop statement, it's an extended if-else statement in my view - and do you call continue in if-else? –  Zathrus Writer Sep 10 '12 at 10:35
    
I don't think its a good idea to ask for generic advice about programming constructs that are just called the same in different langauges. Seek for advice for every single language. They are different after all, all with different good practices. So my advice would be to use continue in those languages where it works, and where it is deemed to be commonly a good thing to do. –  PlasmaHH Sep 10 '12 at 10:36
    
@ZathrusWriter The question says "end of for loop", not "end of the loop". The continue in the question is intended to jump to the end of the for loop. –  hvd Sep 10 '12 at 10:38
    
@hvd lol, I need better glasses... sorry :D –  Zathrus Writer Sep 10 '12 at 10:42
2  
@Rookie: I would say there are enough big and small differences between php and c++ that you should be careful at each and every line, and not just try to "visually translate" the source code. Imho this is just one of the many trip mines you encounter when translating; between any languages, not just php and c++. –  PlasmaHH Sep 10 '12 at 10:48

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, continue and break are the same in PHP when using switch statements.

Don't let PHP ruin your experiences in other languages, and continue to use continue where you need it!

share|improve this answer
    
That is very weird, why is it the same, whats the point duplicating commands? –  Rookie Sep 10 '12 at 10:40
1  
@Rookie In C++, continue and break are the same in a do { ... } while (0) loop too, but they are different in other contexts. In PHP, continue and break are the same in a switch statement, but they are different in other contexts. –  hvd Sep 10 '12 at 10:42
    
Well as @TheForestAndTheTrees pointed out from the manual, switch is considered a looping structure, and continue is made for looping structures. Unfortunately I've never see a switch 'loop', have you? –  Aesthete Sep 10 '12 at 10:42
    
@hvd, wait... in c++ a do-while loop continue acts like a break command? now i am confused... i also dont understand the idea behind "loop structure" in the PHP's switch statement. if you use switch on PHP, does it simply loop through some sort of array, instead of epicly fast finds the correct path (like in c++, i assume) ?! –  Rookie Sep 10 '12 at 10:46
1  

Try using continue 2 to continue to the next iteration of the loop surrounding the switch statement.

share|improve this answer

The documentation for the PHP continue statement makes this clear:

Note: Note that in PHP the switch statement is considered a looping structure for the purposes of continue.

You should know that different languages give the same keywords subtly different meanings, and not assume that PHP continue behaves the same as C++ continue.

If continue makes sense in a PHP switch where it wouldn't work in C++, do use it.

If continue makes sense in a C++ switch where it wouldn't work in PHP, do use it.

share|improve this answer

In C and C++, the switch statement is only a fancy combination of if/else if and labels/goto, so using continue inside switch is okay. But as you noticed it doesn't do what you expect it to in other languages that are similar to C or C++. That's because they are only similar when it comes to syntax, for semantic rules they are very different beasts. So a thing that works in one language will most definitely not work in another even if the languages look similar.

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Using continue inside a C++ switch / case construct that is embedded in a loop is perfectly OK. You shouldn't restrict your style in C++ just because of misbehavior occurring in other programming languages.

share|improve this answer
    
continue can only occur in an iteration statement in C++. Example in OP is only legal because there's a for-loop enclosing the switch statement. –  jrok Sep 10 '12 at 10:38
    
@jrok clarified that, better now? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 10 '12 at 10:40
    
Better indeed.. –  jrok Sep 10 '12 at 10:41

It is important to note that continue and break do not behave the same when the switch statement is nested within a loop. If you are using a switch statement to evaluate something, and want to move onto the next item within the loop if the condition is met, you should use continue 2. Using break 2 in this case will break out of the entire for loop, which may not be the desired action.

share|improve this answer

As is warned in the PHP Manual:

"Note that in PHP the switch statement is considered a looping structure for the purposes of continue."

So the use of continue will break out of the switch statement, not the for loop. The perils of assuming similar syntax across languages.

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