Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

struct delete_ptr
{
    template<typename T>
    void operator()(T*& t)
    {
        delete t;
        t = 0;
    }
};

struct is_null_ptr
{
    template<typename T>
    bool operator()(T*& t)
    {
        return t == 0;
    }
};

struct A
{
    static void removeDead(A*& a)
    {
        if(a and a->dead)
            delete_ptr()(a);
    }

    static void killSome(A* a)
    {
        if(a and a->isDead() == false and rand()%100 == 0)
        {
            static int counter = 0;
            cout << "Kill___" << ++counter << endl;
            a->kill();
        }
    }

    static void reviveSome(A* a)
    {

        if(a and a->isDead() and rand()%3 == 0)
        {
            static int counter = 0;
            cout << "Revive___" << ++counter << endl;
            a->revive();
        }
    }

    A():dead(false)
    {

    }

    virtual ~A()
    {
        static int counter = 0;
        cout << "Dtor___" << ++counter << endl;
    }

    bool isDead(){return dead;}
    void kill(){dead = true;}
    void revive(){dead = false;}

    bool dead;
};

int main()
{
    srand(time(0));
    vector<A*> as;
    for(int i = 0; i < 200; ++i)
    {
        A* a = new A;
        as.push_back(a);
    }


    for_each(as.begin(),as.end(),A::killSome);
    for_each(as.begin(),as.end(),A::reviveSome);

    for_each(as.begin(),as.end(),A::removeDead);
    as.erase( std::remove_if(as.begin(),as.end(),is_null_ptr()),as.end());
    cout << as.size() << endl;

    for_each(as.begin(),as.end(),delete_ptr());
    as.clear();

    return 0;
}

It allocates them, and prints the right output but I'm not sure this is the right thing I'm doing. I was just trying to use pointers in a vector and delete them when a certain condition happens, without using boost or c++11. So what do you think about it?

share|improve this question
2  
Use a std::vector<std::unique_ptr<A>>. –  Kerrek SB Sep 10 '12 at 11:04
2  
I'm trying to achieve this without the c++11 features. –  user1659900 Sep 10 '12 at 11:25
1  
No, this is usually not a good way. Why are you storing pointers in the vector in the first place, rather than concrete objects? –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 10 '12 at 12:26
    
@user1659900: Even without C++11, you can still write (most of) unique_ptr using Boost.Move. –  Mankarse Sep 10 '12 at 12:28
    
"without using boost or c++11" –  Aesthete Sep 10 '12 at 12:51
show 3 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since the only smart pointer present in the current STL (auto_ptr) cannot be used in containers, I would say your way is a good one under the given conditions.

You could think about implementing your own unique_ptr or shared_ptr however.

PS: There are many reasons to use pointers instead of the actual objects in a container, one is polymorphism. Another one is that the actual objects are already stored somewhere else (think of an index structure to already stored objects).

share|improve this answer
2  
If the objects are stored somewhere else and the vector should only reference them, you would never need to delete the pointers. –  Xeo Sep 10 '12 at 13:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.