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I have to write down the Big O notation of an algorithm I had to think up for my homework.

I'm able to tell that the code below is O(n^2). Because for every x I have to go through all of the y's and it becomes slower as the world grows larger.

int[][] world = new world[20][20];
for (int x = 0; x < 20; x++)
{
    for (int y = 0; y < 20; y++)
    {
        ..
    }
}

But, for another question I have to go through the bottom half of the world, so my y loop gets halved.

int[][] world = new world[20][20];
for (int x = 0; x < 20; x++)
{
    for (int y = 10; y < 20; y++)
    {
        ..
    }
}

I'm not quite sure what Big O notation is appropriate for the above loop, is it still O(n^2) because it still becomes slower the bigger the world gets? Or is it O(log n) because the y is halved?

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11  
O(n * n/2) = 1/2 * O(n^2) = O(n^2) –  assylias Sep 10 '12 at 11:14
1  
AFAICS both of these run in constant time and use constant storage. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 15 '12 at 0:02

3 Answers 3

it is simply speaking O(n*n/2)=O(n^2) since constants arent considered in big O.

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I think I disagree with you, since the Big(O) notation refers to behavior for really big values (like infinity) the fact that one of the two infinities is divided by 2 doesn't change much, it still comes down to n squared. –  Shivan Dragon Sep 10 '12 at 11:18
    
the first line is a general solution for variable terminal values in the loop and the second line is the particular solution to the problem. –  Anurag Ramdasan Sep 10 '12 at 11:19
1  
I'm sorry but I don't understand your comment. As far as I can see, the first solution is O(n^2). The second solution uses the same algorithm, only on a smaller set of data. The fact that the data changes doesn't modify the BigO value of the algorithm. Isn't it? –  Shivan Dragon Sep 10 '12 at 11:23
    
oh yes i agree. sorry for that. modified the answer. thanks for pointing it out. –  Anurag Ramdasan Sep 10 '12 at 11:30
1  
@ShivanDragon Thanks for pointing out that changes in the data don't modify the Big O of the algorithm, I was confused about this! –  Kevin Sep 10 '12 at 11:31

It's O(n^2) as y is still a function of n i.e. O(n^2/2) is still O(n^2).

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Both of your algorithms are in fact O(n) (assuming n is the number of bits in the input, which is the common definition). The first one touches each "pixel" in the world array once, so it's easy to see it is O(n). The second one touches half of the pixels, but is still O(n) since O(n/2) = O(n). In both cases, doubling the size of the world array will more or less double the execution time, which is typical of O(n) algorithms.

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But for each x there are just as many y so it's quadratic, right? –  Kevin Sep 10 '12 at 11:30
    
Sure, if you set n=x=y then it will come out as O(n^2). The typical definition of n is the size of the input however, in this case meaning n=x*y*32. –  finalman Sep 10 '12 at 11:34
1  
Theoretically speaking - this answer is correct. Traditionally, n in the big-O notation denotes the input size. In this case, the input is of size 20x20, so n=400. However, it is also commonly used to denote n and m as two dimensions of the problem, and produce complexity function f(n,m) –  amit Sep 10 '12 at 11:35
    
@finalman Ah, I see what you mean. But in this example n^2 just indicates that the algorithm has 2 loops in it? –  Kevin Sep 10 '12 at 11:42
    
@Kevin The two nested loops does make it look like an O(n^2) algorithm at first glance. However in this case it is not (of course, depending on what you define n to be). Note that you could rewrite the algorithm to a version with one loop, looping from 0 to x*y. –  finalman Sep 10 '12 at 13:31

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