Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm newbie at C# and Marshaling. I need to use my C func in C#, but i have an incorrect return value from C func (or I don't know how to convert it to correct answer).

C source:

#include "main.h"

char *Ololo(char *arg, int &n3)
{
    char *szRet;
    szRet=(char*)malloc(strlen(arg)+1);
    strcpy(szRet,arg);
    n3 = strlen(szRet);
    return szRet;
}

C header:

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) char *Ololo(char *arg, int &n3);

C# source:

class Program
{
    [DllImport(@"F:\Projects\service\dll\testDLL2.DLL", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr Ololo([In] char[] arg, ref Int32 n3);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string n1 = "ololo";
        char[] chars = new char[n1.Length];
        chars = n1.ToCharArray();
        Int32 n3 = 0;
        IntPtr result;
        result = Ololo(chars, ref n3);
        string n4 = Marshal.PtrToStringUni(result,n3);
        Console.WriteLine(n4);
    }
}

I've got return something like "o?? ?"

Sorry for bad English

----------------------Solved-----------------------

class Program
    {
        [DllImport(@"F:\Projects\service\dll\testDLL2.DLL", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        public static extern IntPtr Ololo([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string arg, ref Int32 n3);

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string n1 = "ololo";
            Int32 n3 = 0;
            int n2 = n1.Length;
            IntPtr result;
            result = Ololo(n1, ref n3);
            string n4 = Marshal.PtrToStringAnsi(result, n3);
            Console.WriteLine(n4);
        }
    }

That works fine. In n3 i ve got 5 and in n4 ololo! Thank s for quick answers!

share|improve this question
    
btw 'int &n3' is not C, its C++ notation. – Anders K. Sep 10 '12 at 12:31
    
You haven't solved anything, the code leaks the memory for the string. – Hans Passant Sep 10 '12 at 12:57
    
possible duplicate of Char * marshalling in C# – Hans Passant Sep 10 '12 at 12:57
    
@Hans Passant There is one difference: On your link func which return char * was rewrited to void func. In my question the first was how to catch return(char ). And if there is memory leak, how to free return(char) in c#? – Treno1 Sep 11 '12 at 6:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

public static extern IntPtr Ololo([In] char[] arg, ref Int32 n3);

IntPtr is the wrong return type, as essentially you want to return the string, not a pointer to the string. In C you can use a pointer to your string by using char*, the equivalent in .NET would be to use use this: [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string. This should marshall the char* to a string correctly.

IntPtr represents a pointer type, which to get your actual string is useless.

Also looks like you should be taking a StringBuilder into your Marshalled function, and not a char[]. Then at least you should be getting the correct string to your C function.

share|improve this answer
    
I think IntPtr is correct because n3 returns me 1 and int IntPtr Ive got first letter (o). But why I have n3` = 1? I think it needs to be 5. Because of that I think [In] char[] arg` is incorrect. But what is correct? – Treno1 Sep 10 '12 at 11:58
    
See my edited answer – Tony The Lion Sep 10 '12 at 12:01
    
@Treno1 your function in .NET will never give you the entire string back if you return IntPtr. – Tony The Lion Sep 10 '12 at 12:02
    
System.AccessViolationException if I try to public static extern StringBuilder Ololo(string arg, ref Int32 n3); and StringBuilder n5 = Ololo(n1, ref n3); – Treno1 Sep 10 '12 at 12:10
1  
Thanks! Solved! Up! – Treno1 Sep 10 '12 at 12:16

The marshaller does not NULL terminate char arrays for funsies. It will do it because you told it to- if you told it to. You are fortunate because a char in .NET is UTF-16, and this is 16 bits wide- and the second byte will be zero because that is 'o' in UTF-16, thus giving a strlen of 1. The actual effort to pass in a managed string as a null-terminated C string is a tad higher than you seem to appreciate. So let the marshaller do all the work- it already knows how to do this job.

public static extern [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string Ololo(
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string arg,
    ref int n3
);
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string n1 = "ololo";
    Int32 n3 = 0;
    string n4 = Ololo(chars, ref n3);
    Console.WriteLine(n4);
}
share|improve this answer
    
VS 2010 think that public static extern [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string Ololo is incorrect because of [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] cannot be in declaration of class , structure or interface. – Treno1 Sep 10 '12 at 12:07
    
It isn't. You must have failed to copy the DLLImport attribute over, or placed the declaration in the wrong place. – Puppy Sep 10 '12 at 12:09
    
Thanks! Solved! Up! – Treno1 Sep 10 '12 at 12:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.