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Hello what i am trying to achieve is combining this line of code: This is for my user Registrar

    if (isset($_POST['unenroll'])){
                $sql1="Update tbl_enroll SET status='unEnrolled'";
                    $unEn = mysql_query($sql1) or die (mysql_error());
                    }

To another code that will truncate ONLY the field in my database which is COUNT So far this is what I am thinking:

      if (isset($_POST['unenroll'])){
                $sql1="Update tbl_enroll SET status='unEnrolled'";
                    $unEn = mysql_query($sql1) or die (mysql_error());
                $trunc="Delete count from tbl_enroll";
                    $restart = mysql_query($trunc) or die (mysql_error());
                    }

By the way the column i want to delete all data while maintaining the column is count am i doing this right? Cause i don't wanna erase all data right now,Also is this coding structure correct? Why i am doing this is because i have an action in my system that would allow another type of user to update only 3 times so i want my registrar if a certain period is met the registrar would restart the count to begin again at 0. (With my basic knowledge I'm trying to learn mysql, don't need to remind me about Mysqli or PDO i'll get there when I'm better)

EDITED: please read again. EDITED: My bad so truncate is a bad idea. I just want the column count in my database to erase/refresh the entire data but maintaining the column itself.

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2  
Truncate is used to purge a table of all data. Don't truncate whatever table you are doing, you might regret it shortly afterwards. Now, put the truncate function on the ground and kick it over here, lets talk this through - no table has to get hurt... –  Fluffeh Sep 10 '12 at 12:16
1  
I guess you just want to reset count to zero? or increment it? –  Najzero Sep 10 '12 at 12:17
    
@Najzero Yes reset, uh so truncate is a bad idea. Good thing i didn't do it. –  Tony Sep 10 '12 at 12:20
1  
then simply combine the update command to "UPDATE tbl_entroll SET status='unEnrolled', count = 0" (but better but a WHERE clause there too or else you update all rows all the time) –  Najzero Sep 10 '12 at 12:21
    
@Najzero Can you supply that as the answer so i might accept it, I think yours is correct, No need for a where this action is suppose to set all columns in the database to unEnrolled and reset the count –  Tony Sep 10 '12 at 12:24
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you requested my comment in answer form, you can simply combine more update of columns after SET with an comma making your code:

 if (isset($_POST['unenroll']))
 {
     $sql1="Update tbl_enroll SET status='unEnrolled', count = 0";
     $unEn = mysql_query($sql1) or die (mysql_error());
 }
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