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I'm looking for a simple commons method or operator that allows me to repeat some String n times. I know I could write this using a for loop, but I wish to avoid for loops whenever necessary and a simple direct method should exist somewhere.

String str = "abc";
String repeated = str.repeat(3);

repeated.equals("abcabcabc");

Related to:

repeat string javascript Create NSString by repeating another string a given number of times

Edited

I try to avoid for loops when they are not completely necessary because:

  1. They add to the number of lines of code even if they are tucked away in another function.

  2. Someone reading my code has to figure out what I am doing in that for loop. Even if it is commented and has meaningful variables names, they still have to make sure it is not doing anything "clever".

  3. Programmers love to put clever things in for loops, even if I write it to "only do what it is intended to do", that does not preclude someone coming along and adding some additional clever "fix".

  4. They are very often easy to get wrong. For loops that involving indexes tend to generate off by one bugs.

  5. For loops often reuse the same variables, increasing the chance of really hard to find scoping bugs.

  6. For loops increase the number of places a bug hunter has to look.

share|improve this question
15  
I understand that for loops can cause some real issues. But you shouldn't try to avoid for loops "at all costs" because if it costs you readability, maintainability, and speed, you're being counterproductive. This is one of those cases. –  Imagist Aug 5 '09 at 21:39
5  
"They add to the number of lines of code even if they are tucked away in another function"...wow, just wow. Big-O, not LoC –  Pyrolistical Aug 5 '09 at 23:40
4  
@imagist I'm avoiding for loops in situations where it costs me readability, and maintainability. I consider speed as the least important issue here (a non-issue in fact). I think for loops are overused and I am trying to learn to only use for loops when they are necessary and not as a default solution. –  Ethan Heilman Aug 6 '09 at 0:29
2  
@e5;sorry for posting years later.I find this question so appropriate. If inserted in a method, arguments should be tested (times>=0), errors thrown etc.This adds robustness but also lines of code to read. Repeating a string is something unambiguous.Who reads the code knows exactly what a string.repeat does, even without a line of comment or javadoc.If we use a stable library, is reasonable to think that a so-simple function has no bugs,YET introduces some form of "robustness" check that we even need to worry about.If i could ask 10 improvements, this (kind of) things would be one. –  AgostinoX Sep 21 '11 at 21:01
2  
@AgostinoX Looking back at this question I realize one more problem with for loops. They specify the order in which actions must be performed when most of the time the engineer only wants to perform some action on every element in a list (regardless of order). This order dependency makes it much harder for compilers to parallelize code. I think the python map function has the right of it: docs.python.org/library/functions.html#map –  Ethan Heilman Sep 21 '11 at 21:31

20 Answers 20

up vote 136 down vote accepted

Commons Lang StringUtils.repeat()

Usage:

String str = "abc";
String repeated = StringUtils.repeat(str, 3);

repeated.equals("abcabcabc");
share|improve this answer
59  
using a one-method-dependency for the simplicity's sake in the long run can resulting in a jar-hell –  dfa Aug 5 '09 at 20:03
30  
Sure, except it's commons lang. I don't think I've ever seen a project over 5000 LOCS that didn't have commons lang. –  Ethan Heilman Aug 5 '09 at 20:05
6  
Commons Lang is open source - download it and take a look. Of course it has a loop inside, but it's not quite as simple. A lot of effort went into profiling and optimizing that implementation. –  ChssPly76 Aug 5 '09 at 21:59
7  
I don't avoid loops for performance reason (read my reasons in the question). When someone sees StringUtils.repeat, they know what I am doing. They don't have to worry that I attempted to write my own version of repeat and made a mistake. It is an atomic cognitive unit! –  Ethan Heilman Aug 5 '09 at 22:24
5  
@e5 - The use and reuse of the commons classes, StringUtils especially, reduces maintenence load in a number of ways. Simple, descriptive method names, sensible defaults and null handlings and a stable codebase all make it easier to identfy where bugs are more likely to reside. One idiom I encourage is that loop control always uses "i"; this forces only one loop per method, which means the common problem of incrementing the wrong thing is removed. –  Michael Rutherfurd Aug 6 '09 at 1:06

Here is the shortest version (Java 1.5+ required):

repeated = new String(new char[n]).replace("\0", s);

Where n is the number of times you want to repeat the string and s is the string to repeat.

No imports or libraries needed.

share|improve this answer
19  
This is an elegant and wonderful solution - kudos! –  Quantum Feb 13 '12 at 9:42
13  
A little too obfuscated, but rocks! +1 –  daitangio Nov 23 '12 at 9:43
9  
I don't think it's obfuscated at all. Primitive types (char[], in this case) are instantiated with nulls, then a String is created from the char[], and the nulls are replaced() with the character you want in s –  Amarok Dec 13 '12 at 18:10
4  
It's all obfuscated compared to ruby's String#*, eg. "x" * 3 == "xxx" –  Jared Beck Sep 2 '13 at 5:56
12  
To those who complain about obfuscation, readability depends on literacy. This is perfectly clear in what it does and educational for those who may not see it right away. This is what you get with Java by the way. –  dansalmo Jan 9 at 16:15

Here's a way to do it using only standard String functions and no explicit loops:

// create a string made up of  n  copies of  s
repeated = String.format(String.format("%%%ds", n), " ").replace(" ",s);

+1 Sweet mother of Jesus that is an awesome line of code.

share|improve this answer
2  
Amazing :-) Although beware of n becoming zero…! –  Yang Meyer Jan 12 '10 at 14:14
1  
@Vijay Dev & fortran: No, he meant replace(). In Java 1.5+, there is an overloaded version of replace() that takes two CharSequences (which include Strings): download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/… –  user102008 Feb 4 '11 at 22:32
47  
Ouch. This is ugly. –  Karel Bílek Mar 22 '11 at 18:08
5  
@mzuba let's say n=3: it first formats a string to look something like %03d (%% is to escape the percentage sign), which is the formatting code to add 3 padding zeroes, then formats 0 with that, leading to 000, and finally replaces each 0 with the strings –  fortran Jul 15 '13 at 14:49
7  
You can make the solution less ugly and easier to understand: String.format("%0"+n+"d", 0).replace("0", s) –  Artur Nov 26 '13 at 8:58

If you're like me and want to use Google Guava and not Apache Commons. You can use the repeat method in the Guava Strings class.

Strings.repeat("-", 60);
share|improve this answer

So you want to avoid loops?

Here you have it:

public static String repeat(String s, int times) {
    if (times <= 0) return "";
    else return s + repeat(s, times-1);
}

(of course I know this is ugly and inefficient, but it doesn't have loops :-p)

You want it simpler and prettier? use jython:

s * 3

Edit: let's optimize it a little bit :-D

public static String repeat(String s, int times) {
   if (times <= 0) return "";
   else if (times % 2 == 0) return repeat(s+s, times/2);
   else return s + repeat(s+s, times/2);
}

Edit2: I've done a quick and dirty benchmark for the 4 main alternatives, but I don't have time to run it several times to get the means and plot the times for several inputs... So here's the code if anybody wants to try it:

public class Repeat {
    public static void main(String[] args)  {
        int n = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        String s = args[1];
        int l = s.length();
        long start, end;

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            if(repeatLog2(s,i).length()!=i*l) throw new RuntimeException();
        }
        end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("RecLog2Concat: " + (end-start) + "ms");

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            if(repeatR(s,i).length()!=i*l) throw new RuntimeException();
        }               
        end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("RecLinConcat: " + (end-start) + "ms");

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            if(repeatIc(s,i).length()!=i*l) throw new RuntimeException();
        }
        end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("IterConcat: " + (end-start) + "ms");

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            if(repeatSb(s,i).length()!=i*l) throw new RuntimeException();
        }
        end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("IterStrB: " + (end-start) + "ms");
    }

    public static String repeatLog2(String s, int times) {
        if (times <= 0) {
            return "";
        }
        else if (times % 2 == 0) {
            return repeatLog2(s+s, times/2);
        }
        else {
           return s + repeatLog2(s+s, times/2);
        }
    }

    public static String repeatR(String s, int times) {
        if (times <= 0) {
            return "";
        }
        else {
            return s + repeatR(s, times-1);
        }
    }

    public static String repeatIc(String s, int times) {
        String tmp = "";
        for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
            tmp += s;
        }
        return tmp;
    }

    public static String repeatSb(String s, int n) {
        final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            sb.append(s);
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }
}

It takes 2 arguments, the first is the number of iterations (each function run with repeat times arg from 1..n) and the second is the string to repeat.

So far, a quick inspection of the times running with different inputs leaves the ranking something like this (better to worse):

  1. Iterative StringBuilder append (1x).
  2. Recursive concatenation log2 invocations (~3x).
  3. Recursive concatenation linear invocations (~30x).
  4. Iterative concatenation linear (~45x).

I wouldn't ever guessed that the recursive function was faster than the for loop :-o

Have fun(ctional xD).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for recursion and obviously being a lisp hacker. I don't think this is so inefficient either, string concatenation isn't the warcrime it once was, because + really is just a stringBuilder UTH. See stackoverflow.com/questions/47605/java-string-concatenation and schneide.wordpress.com/2009/02/23/… . I wonder how much all those stack pushes and pops from the recursion cost, or if hotspot takes care of them. Really wish I had the free time to benchmark it. Someone else maybe? –  Ethan Heilman Aug 6 '09 at 1:31
    
+1 a very elegant solution –  dfa Aug 6 '09 at 2:26
    
@e5: fortran is right; this solution could be made more efficient. This implementation will unnecessarily create a new StringBuilder (and a new String) for each recursion. Still a nice solution though. –  rob Aug 6 '09 at 3:02
3  
@e5 I'd wish I were a Lisp hacker xD... If I were, I would have used a tail recursive function :-p –  fortran Aug 6 '09 at 8:41
1  
Microbenchmarks don't work well in Java. Trying to measure the speed of your implementations like that is not good. –  ceklock Dec 9 '12 at 1:08

This is as simple as it gets:

// create a string made up of n copies of s
String.format("%0" + n + "d", 0).replace("0",s);
share|improve this answer
    
Hehe - I've just came to the exactly same solution ;-) –  Artur Nov 26 '13 at 9:07

This contains less characters than your question

public static String repeat(String s, int n) {
    if(s == null) {
        return null;
    }
    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(s.length() * n);
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        sb.append(s);
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
22  
Should be new StringBuilder(s.length() * n). –  James Schek Aug 5 '09 at 19:27
3  
It contains more characters than my answer StringUtils.repeat(str, n). –  Ethan Heilman Aug 5 '09 at 19:32
6  
Unless you're already using Apache Commons, this answer is a lot less hassle - no downloading another library, including it in your classpath, making sure its license is compatible with yours, etc. –  Paul Tomblin Aug 5 '09 at 19:44
3  
Please, never return null - in that case return an empty string, allowing you to always use the returned value unchecked. Otherwise, what I would recommend the poster to use. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 5 '09 at 22:52
6  
Well, there are three ways to handle if s is null. 1. Pass the error (return null), 2. Hide the error (return ""), 3. Throw an NPE. Hiding the error and throwing an NPE are not cool, so I passed the error. –  Pyrolistical Aug 5 '09 at 23:34

based on fortran's answer, this is a recusive version that uses a StringBuilder:

public static void repeat(StringBuilder stringBuilder, String s, int times) {
    if (times > 0) {
        repeat(stringBuilder.append(s), s, times - 1);
    }
}

public static String repeat(String s, int times) {
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder(s.length() * times);
    repeat(stringBuilder, s, times);
    return stringBuilder.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, I like the use of recursion by reference. –  Ethan Heilman Aug 6 '09 at 4:13
    
Agreed that's a pretty cool method there. –  Imagist Aug 6 '09 at 6:38
    
looping rather than recursion would reduce the # of stack frames for large numbers of repeats. –  La-comadreja Jun 29 at 2:56

using Dollar is simple as typing:

@Test
public void repeatString() {
    String string = "abc";
    assertThat($(string).repeat(3).toString(), is("abcabcabc"));
}

PS: repeat works also for array, List, Set, etc

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting –  ceklock Dec 9 '12 at 1:24
    
is the assertThat() method really needed? –  ceklock Dec 16 '12 at 23:35

I wanted a function to create a comma-delimited list of question marks for JDBC purposes, and found this post. So, I decided to take two variants and see which one performed better. After 1 million iterations, the garden-variety StringBuilder took 2 seconds (fun1), and the cryptic supposedly more optimal version (fun2) took 30 seconds. What's the point of being cryptic again?

private static String fun1(int size) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(size * 2);
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        sb.append(",?");
    }
    return sb.substring(1);
}

private static String fun2(int size) {
    return new String(new char[size]).replaceAll("\0", ",?").substring(1);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I makes sense that the second one would take much longer. It is performing a string search and then modifying the string character by character. –  Ethan Heilman Dec 6 '12 at 16:14

using only JRE classes (System.arraycopy) and trying to minimize the number of temp objects you can write something like:

public static String repeat(String toRepeat, int times) {
    if (toRepeat == null) {
        toRepeat = "";
    }

    if (times < 0) {
        times = 0;
    }

    final int length = toRepeat.length();
    final int total = length * times;
    final char[] src = toRepeat.toCharArray();
    char[] dst = new char[total];

    for (int i = 0; i < total; i += length) {
        System.arraycopy(src, 0, dst, i, length);
    }

    return String.copyValueOf(dst);
}

EDIT

and without loops you can try with:

public static String repeat2(String toRepeat, int times) {
    if (toRepeat == null) {
        toRepeat = "";
    }

    if (times < 0) {
        times = 0;
    }

    String[] copies = new String[times];
    Arrays.fill(copies, toRepeat);
    return Arrays.toString(copies).
              replace("[", "").
              replace("]", "").
              replaceAll(", ", "");
}

EDIT 2

using Collections is even shorter:

public static String repeat3(String toRepeat, int times) {
    return Collections.nCopies(times, toRepeat).
           toString().
           replace("[", "").
           replace("]", "").
           replaceAll(", ", "");
}

however I still like the first version.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, clever! Claps hands! –  Ethan Heilman Aug 5 '09 at 20:07
3  
Have you tried it with e.g. repeat3("[, ]", 5) ? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 5 '09 at 22:57
4  
-1: too clever by half. If your aim is to make you code readable or efficient, these "solutions" are not a good idea. 'repeat' could simply be rewritten using a StringBuilder (setting the initial capacity). And 'repeat2' / 'repeat3' are really inefficient, and depend on the unspecified syntax of the String produced by String[].toString(). –  Stephen C Aug 5 '09 at 23:14
    
They are cool tho, I wouldn't use them in my code, but you have to appreciate that they are pretty neat hacks. –  Ethan Heilman Aug 6 '09 at 0:32
    
@Thorb: absolutely, with this code you cannot use "metacharacter", [], –  dfa Aug 6 '09 at 2:22

Java 8's String.join provides a tidy way to do this in conjunction with Collections.nCopies:

// say hello 100 times
System.out.println(String.join("", Collections.nCopies(100, "hello")));
share|improve this answer

If you are worried about performance, just use a StringBuilder inside the loop and do a .toString() on exit of the Loop. Heck, write your own Util Class and reuse it. 5 Lines of code max.

share|improve this answer

I really enjoy this question. There is a lot of knowledge and styles. So I can't leave it without show my rock and roll ;)

{
    String string = repeat("1234567890", 4);
    System.out.println(string);
    System.out.println("=======");
    repeatWithoutCopySample(string, 100000);
    System.out.println(string);// This take time, try it without printing
    System.out.println(string.length());
}

/**
 * The core of the task.
 */
@SuppressWarnings("AssignmentToMethodParameter")
public static char[] repeat(char[] sample, int times) {
    char[] r = new char[sample.length * times];
    while (--times > -1) {
        System.arraycopy(sample, 0, r, times * sample.length, sample.length);
    }
    return r;
}

/**
 * Java classic style.
 */
public static String repeat(String sample, int times) {
    return new String(repeat(sample.toCharArray(), times));
}

/**
 * Java extreme memory style.
 */
@SuppressWarnings("UseSpecificCatch")
public static void repeatWithoutCopySample(String sample, int times) {
    try {
        Field valueStringField = String.class.getDeclaredField("value");
        valueStringField.setAccessible(true);
        valueStringField.set(sample, repeat((char[]) valueStringField.get(sample), times));
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        throw new RuntimeException(ex);
    }
}

Do you like it?

share|improve this answer
1  
In my more extreme test, I produce a 1,700,000,000 (1.7 gigas) string repeat length,, using -Xms4937m –  Daniel De León Apr 3 '13 at 1:18
public static String repeat(String str, int times) {
    int length = str.length();
    int size = length * times;
    char[] c = new char[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        c[i] = str.charAt(i % length);
    }
    return new String(c);
}
share|improve this answer

Simple loop

public static String repeat(String string, int times) {
    StringBuilder out = new StringBuilder();
    while (times-- > 0) {
        out.append(string);
    }
    return out.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

Try this out:

public static char[] myABCs = {'a', 'b', 'c'};
public static int numInput;
static Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.print("Enter Number of Times to repeat: ");
    numInput = in.nextInt();
    repeatArray(numInput);
}

public static int repeatArray(int y) {
    for (int a = 0; a < y; a++) {
        for (int b = 0; b < myABCs.length; b++) {
            System.out.print(myABCs[b]);                
        }
        System.out.print(" ");
    }
    return y;
}
share|improve this answer

Despite your desire not to use loops, I think you should use a loop.

String repeatString(String s, int repetitions)
{
    if(repetitions < 0) throw SomeException();

    else if(s == null) return null;

    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder(s.length() * repetitions);

    for(int i = 0; i < repetitions; i++)
        stringBuilder.append(s);

    return stringBuilder.toString();
}

Your reasons for not using a for loop are not good ones. In response to your criticisms:

  1. Whatever solution you use will almost certainly be longer than this. Using a pre-built function only tucks it under more covers.
  2. Someone reading your code will have to figure out what you're doing in that non-for-loop. Given that a for-loop is the idiomatic way to do this, it would be much easier to figure out if you did it with a for loop.
  3. Yes someone might add something clever, but by avoiding a for loop you are doing something clever. That's like shooting yourself in the foot intentionally to avoid shooting yourself in the foot by accident.
  4. Off-by-one errors are also mind-numbingly easy to catch with a single test. Given that you should be testing your code, an off-by-one error should be easy to fix and catch. And it's worth noting: the code above does not contain an off-by-one error. For loops are equally easy to get right.
  5. So don't reuse variables. That's not the for-loop's fault.
  6. Again, so does whatever solution you use. And as I noted before; a bug hunter will probably be expecting you to do this with a for loop, so they'll have an easier time finding it if you use a for loop.
share|improve this answer
3  
-1. Here's two exercises for you: a) run your code with repetitions = -5. b) download Commons Lang and run repeatString('a', 1000) a million times in a loop; do the same with your code; compare the times. For extra credit do the same with repeatString('ab', 1000). –  ChssPly76 Aug 5 '09 at 22:04
2  
Are you arguing that your code is more readable then StringUtils.repeat("ab",1000)? Because that was my answer that you've downvoted. It also performs better and has no bugs. –  ChssPly76 Aug 5 '09 at 22:19
2  
Read the 2nd sentence in the question you're quoting. "I try to avoid for loops at all costs because" was added to the question as a clarification in response to Andrew Hare's answer after my reply - not that it matters because if the position you're taking is "answer is bad if loop is used anywhere" there are no answers to the OP question. Even dfa's solutions - inventive as they are - use for loops inside. "jar hell" was replied to above; commons lang is used in every decent-sized application anyway and thus doesn't add a new dependency. –  ChssPly76 Aug 5 '09 at 23:01
2  
@ChssPly76 at this point I'm pretty sure imagist is trolling. I really have a hard time seeing how anyone could read what I wrote and seriously think the responses typed above. –  Ethan Heilman Aug 6 '09 at 0:37
1  
@ChssPly76 my answers don't have any loops at all :-p –  fortran Aug 6 '09 at 13:54

here is the latest Stringutils.java StringUtils.java

    public static String repeat(String str, int repeat) {
    // Performance tuned for 2.0 (JDK1.4)

    if (str == null) {
        return null;
    }
    if (repeat <= 0) {
        return EMPTY;
    }
    int inputLength = str.length();
    if (repeat == 1 || inputLength == 0) {
        return str;
    }
    if (inputLength == 1 && repeat <= PAD_LIMIT) {
        return repeat(str.charAt(0), repeat);
    }

    int outputLength = inputLength * repeat;
    switch (inputLength) {
        case 1 :
            return repeat(str.charAt(0), repeat);
        case 2 :
            char ch0 = str.charAt(0);
            char ch1 = str.charAt(1);
            char[] output2 = new char[outputLength];
            for (int i = repeat * 2 - 2; i >= 0; i--, i--) {
                output2[i] = ch0;
                output2[i + 1] = ch1;
            }
            return new String(output2);
        default :
            StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder(outputLength);
            for (int i = 0; i < repeat; i++) {
                buf.append(str);
            }
            return buf.toString();
    }
    }

it doesn't even need to be this big, can be made into this, and can be copied and pasted into a utility class in your project.

    public static String repeat(String str, int num) {
    int len = num * str.length();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(len);
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        sb.append(str);
    }
    return sb.toString();
    }

So e5, I think the best way to do this would be to simply use the above mentioned code,or any of the answers here. but commons lang is just too big if it's a small project

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think there is much else you can do... excet maybe an AOT!! –  alexhairyman Aug 11 '11 at 5:01
repeated = str + str + str;

Sometimes simple is best. Everyone reading the code can see what's happening.

And the compiler will do the fancy stuff with StringBuilder behind the scenes for you.

share|improve this answer

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