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I have this C++ code.

Loop goes throgh the matrix, finds the min element in each row and subtracts it from each element of corresponding row. Variable myr is a summ of all min elements

Trying to parallel for:

int min = 0;
int myr = 0;  
int temp[SIZE][SIZE];
int size = 0;
...//some initialization

omp_set_num_threads(1);
start_time = omp_get_wtime();
    #ifdef _OPENMP
    #pragma omp parallel for firstprivate(min, size) reduction(+:myr) 
    #endif
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++){
        min = INFINITY;
        for(int j = 0; j < size; j++){
                if (temp[i][j] < min)                
                    min = temp[i][j];                        
        }
        myr+=min;
        for(int j = 0; j < size; j++) 
                temp[i][j]-=min;
    }
end_time = omp_get_wtime();

if I set omp_set_num_threads(2); this part of code starts working slower.

My proc has 2 cores

Why code works slower with 2 threads?

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1  
First of all, OMP doesn't mean that automagically you get increased speed. Second thing, probably the conditional branch acts as a barrier, so the overhead is bigger. – linello Sep 10 '12 at 13:19
1  
The ultimate question is: is your algorithm suitable for data parrallellism? Can thread A run an iteration of your outer for loop and thread B another iteration of the outer loop without them having to wait on each other? – Tony The Lion Sep 10 '12 at 13:20
1  
From first looks, it cannot. So your adding a thread is futile. – Tony The Lion Sep 10 '12 at 13:21
    
@Tony The Lion: Why do you say it cannot? The only part where they clash is the reduction variable, which is one addition done at the end. – Tudor Sep 10 '12 at 13:22
1  
Ive seen lots of questions on the multithreading tag where people just assume that more threads equals better performance. Maybe we should create a wiki or something explaining why its not always the case. – Brady Sep 10 '12 at 13:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There must be some aliasing or something going on. Make things simpler for OpenMP:

int const size0 = size;
#ifdef _OPENMP
#pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:myr) 
#endif
for(int i = 0; i < size0; i++){
    int min = INFINITY;
    int * tmp = temp[i];
    for(int j = 0; j < size0; j++){
            if (tmp[j] < min)                
                min = tmp[j];                        
    }
    for(int j = 0; j < size0; j++) 
            tmp[j]-=min;
    myr+=min;
}

That is, have most of the variables local and const if you may.

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The parallel part can be reinterpreted as follows (I have used the snippet by @jens-gustedt, but to my experience it didn't make much difference):

#pragma omp parallel private(myr_private) shared(myr)
{
    myr_private = 0;
    #pragma omp for 
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++){
        int min = INFINITY;
        int * tmp = temp[i];
        for(int j = 0; j < size; j++){
            if (tmp[j] < min)                
                min = tmp[j];                        
        }
        for(int j = 0; j < size; j++) 
            tmp[j]-=min;
        myr_private+=min;
    }
    #pragma omp critical
    {
        myr+=myr_private;
    }
}

(This interpretation is straight from http://www.openmp.org/mp-documents/OpenMP3.1.pdf Example A.36.2c). If number of threads is n>1, there is overhead when #pragma omp parallel creates additional thread(s) and then in critical section, which all of the threads should wait for.

I have experimented with different matrix sizes and in my limited tests two threads are considerably faster with sizes above 1000, and start lagging behind with sizes below 500.

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