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In another question I posted recently I was suggested to use a java.util.Timer in the SwingWorker instead of a while loop. The tasks in the SwingWorker are supposed to run every 10 seconds.

From my understanding, java.util.Timer creates a background thread (run()) to perform tasks.

If I use the java.util.Timer in the SwingWorker thread, isn't it inefficient to create another thread (Timer) in a thread (SwingWorker)?

Please take a look at my two examples below and let me know which one is the correct one, or if none of the two are correct what else I should use (and please provide me with a short sample code if possible)? Thank you

Example 1 - using java.util.Timer

import java.util.List;
import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;
import javax.swing.SwingWorker;

public class Example1 extends SwingWorker<Void, String> {

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground() {

        int delay = 10000;//Delay for 10 seconds

        Timer timer = new Timer();

        timer.schedule(new TimerTask() {
            @Override
            public void run() {

                String database = "";

                //PARSE THE SQL DATABASE

                publish(database);//UPDATE THE GUI

            }
        }, delay);

        return null;
    }

    @Override
    protected void process(List<String> s) {
        //UPDATE THE GUI
    }
}

Example 2 - using While loop

import java.util.List;
import javax.swing.SwingWorker;

public class Example2 extends SwingWorker<Void, String> {

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground() {

        while (!this.isCancelled()) {

            String database = "";

            //PARSE THE SQL DATABASE

            publish(database);//UPDATE THE GUI

            try {
                synchronized (this) {
                    this.wait(10000);//Wait 10 seconds
                }
            } catch (Exception ex) {
            }

        }

        return null;
    }

    @Override
    protected void process(List<String> s) {
        //UPDATE THE GUI
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the only thing that SwingWorker is doing is to launch a timer then it's useless indeed. Just spawn the timer from the UI thread and use SwingUtilities.InvokeLater to update the GUI from the timer.

An even better alternative is ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. I will try the ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor, but let us assume I decided to go with a timer. Which is more correct to use from the UI thread: the javax.swing.Timer or java.util.Timer? –  jadrijan Sep 10 '12 at 14:05
2  
@jadrijan: It depends. If you are doing long computations or I/Os that don't use the GUI (like db access) use java.util.Timer + specific functions to update the GUI at the end. If all the actions of the timer are just updating the GUI use javax.swing.Timer. The difference between them is that the code of javax.swing.Timer is executed on the GUI thread. –  Tudor Sep 10 '12 at 14:07
    
Oh cool, thank you so much for explaining this to me in plain English. Honestly, I couldn't understand their differences from the examples I have come across due to wording (I am an ESL speaker :) ). Thank you again for explaining it nicely. –  jadrijan Sep 10 '12 at 14:11
    
Tudor if you can answer one more question regarding the ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor. It is my first time using it and I do not know what the int corePoolSize is that I need to give its constructor. I only want 1 Job scheduled. –  jadrijan Sep 10 '12 at 15:13
1  
@jadrijan: Then use 1. That tells it how many background threads to create. –  Tudor Sep 10 '12 at 15:14

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