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I need to get some specific text out of a string and get that into an arraylist, but I have no idea where to start. The string looks like this:

String exampleString = "some text I don't know <pre>the text I want to get</pre><pre>Some more text I want to get</pre> some text I don't know"

But the problem is that I don't know how many text sections there are with <pre> text </pre> it's even possible that there aren't any of those sections at all.

So could anyone tell me how to get the texts between those <pre> and </pre> and how to get those into an arraylist.

Thank you so much!

UPDATE: What I do know about the text from which I said "some text I don't know" is that it doesn't contain <pre> or </pre>

share|improve this question
    
have you tried a regex? something like <pre>(.+?)</pre>? –  paul Sep 10 '12 at 14:09
    
Do you want to get the whole string or split the string on the <pre>? –  Averroes Sep 10 '12 at 14:09
    
@paul No, could you please explain that a little further? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 14:09
    
@Averroes as long as I get the text between <pre> and </pre> it's ok –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 14:11
    
I am not sure of what do you want but I wou want to get rid of the <pre> tags, you can try String myString = exampleString.replace("<pre>", "").replace("</pre>", "") –  Averroes Sep 10 '12 at 14:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
try {
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("<pre>(.+?)</pre>");
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(yourText);

    while (matcher.find()) {
        //  matcher.group() will contain the match from the previous find() statement
    }
}
catch(Exception ex){}

edited: corrected regex syntax

share|improve this answer
    
But how do you do it when there are multiple sections which start with <pre> and end with </pre>? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 14:42
    
that's what regex does. matcher.find() will return the next match. call it multiple times to find all matches. –  paul Sep 10 '12 at 15:58
    
And what do I have to fill in at yourText? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 17:22
    
Oh I think I get it, is it String exampleString = "some text I don't know <pre>the text I want to get</pre><pre>Some more text I want to get</pre> some text I don't know"? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 18:08
    
yes - yourText is the text that you want to search for <pre> tags –  paul Sep 11 '12 at 9:39

Assuming there's no embedded tags you can do something like this:

private List<String> getText(String text){

    List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();

    String[] sections = text.split("<pre>");
    int i = 0;
    for (String s : sections) {
        i = s.indexOf("</pre>");
        if (i >= 0)          
           results.add(s.substring(0, i));        
    }  
    return result;
}

Example of code running when

say:

text = "test text here <pre> item one </pre> and then another item <pre> item 2 </pre> and then some stuff."

So the first thing to explain is:

String[] sections = text.split("<pre");

This defines a new array of strings and assigns it to the result of a call to the String split function of "text"

This function breaks the string up in to sections delimited by "<pre>" so you get:

sections[0] = "test text here" 
sections[1] = "item one </pre> and then another item"
sections[2] = "item 2 </pre> and then some stuff."

so as you can see from that all we now need to do is remove anything after "</pre>" which is where the next bit comes in:

for (String s : sections)

Is the start of a "for each" loop that assigns the String s to each element of the array sections in turn.

So for each of the 3 strings above we do this:

 i = s.indexOf("</pre>");
    if (i >= 0)          
       results.add(s.substring(0, i));

So if the string contains </pre> then take a substring from the begining up until the "</pre>" and add it to our results. Since sections[1] and sections[2] so contain it they will end up in the results.

I hope this helps?


Here's how i'd implement JavaJugglers solution to avoid using while (true):

private List<String> getText(String text){
    List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();

    int indexStart = text.indexOf("<pre>");
    int indexEnd = text.indexOf("</pre>");
    while (indexStart >= 0 && indexEnd > indexStart) {
        result.add(text.substring(indexStart + 5, indexEnd));
        text = text.substring(indexEnd + 6);
        indexStart = text.indexOf("<pre>");
        indexEnd = text.indexOf("</pre>");
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What does the : mean? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 14:18
2  
It's Java for each syntax, using iterator objects. Introduced in Java 5 I think. It just means for each String in the array called sections, set s to reference that String and do this code. See: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/language/foreach.html –  Glen Lamb Sep 10 '12 at 14:20
    
Ok, thank you very much for both of your solutions, but with the second solution, don't you get in an infinite loop because the indexStart and indexEnd don't change because the exampleString don't change or am I wrong? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 15:09
    
No, you are correct, that code is wrong, it should be "text" not "exampleString" i'll edit. –  Glen Lamb Sep 10 '12 at 15:10
1  
I'll add an explanation to my original post. –  Glen Lamb Sep 11 '12 at 10:32

If you know for sure the HTML will be well-formed, you can start by using simple String methods:

String foo = "some text I don't know <pre>the text I want to get</pre><pre>Some more text I want to get</pre> some text I don't know";
int preStart = foo.indexOf("<pre>");
int preEnd = foo.indexOf("</pre>", preStart);

if (preStart > -1 && preEnd > preStart)
{
    String inBetweenTags = foo.substring(preStart + 5, preEnd);
    System.out.println(inBetweenTags);
}

http://ideone.com/OkE9B

Otherwise use an HTML parser.

share|improve this answer
    
But what does this code do when there are multiple text sections with <pre> and </pre> ? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 14:14
    
It gets the first such section. –  Matt Ball Sep 10 '12 at 14:16
    
Even if the XML is well formed but there are embedded <pre> elements this will go wrong, as you will end up with multiple open tags, but stop reading from the first close. –  Glen Lamb Sep 10 '12 at 14:17
    
@GlenLamb well-formed HTML != well-formed XML. Valid HTML cannot nest <pre> tags. At any rate, the OP did say that "What I do know about the text from which I said "some text I don't know" is that it doesn't contain <pre> or </pre>." –  Matt Ball Sep 10 '12 at 14:20
1  
@Merlin because 5 is the length of the string "<pre>". String#indexOf(String) returns the index in the string where the substring starts, so I need to add the length of the substring to skip past it. –  Matt Ball Sep 10 '12 at 14:36

Here goes a simple solution:

private List<String> getText(String text){

    List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();

    while(true){
        int indexStart = text.indexOf("<pre>");
        int indexEnd = text.indexOf("</pre>");
        if(indexStart >= 0 && indexEnd >= 0 && indexEnd > indexStart){
            result.add(text.substring(indexStart + 5, indexEnd));
            text = text.substring(indexEnd + 6);
        }
        else{
            break;
        }

    }
    return result;
}

Please keep in mind that you could change this function to be more generic, like passing the String to search as a parameter and calculate the substring offsets dynamically. I don't recommend you to use regular expressions because you may have Strings like:

<pre>text<pre>more text</pre>some more text</pre>

with nested "pre" tags.

share|improve this answer
    
While (true) { } –  Glen Lamb Sep 10 '12 at 14:31
    
Why does while(true) shocks you so much? –  JavaJuggler Sep 10 '12 at 14:35
    
Why do you use while(true) could you please explain? –  Merlin Sep 10 '12 at 14:36
    
You loop until your program calls break instruction to get out of the loop, in this case it's when there are no more opening and closing "pre" occurrences. –  JavaJuggler Sep 10 '12 at 14:40
    
While (true) is bad practise as far as I'm concerned, and can be confusing. (case in point). At the very least you should use while (!done). Also your condition in the if doesn't need the second check, since if indexEnd > indexStart it will definitely be greater than 0. –  Glen Lamb Sep 10 '12 at 14:44

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