Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I implement and use command prompt commands through the java and see results in java? The command prompt commands are following:

  1. cd Desktop\nikto-2.1.4
  2. nikto.pl -h www.cirt.net -ssl .

What I should do in order to be able to use those commands in java and to see results?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would use ProcessBuilder to set the current directory and run the second command using cmd.exe. I would combine the error and output and read the output into your Java program.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your response but can you explain please in more details and if possible i need some source codes – Vusal Zarbaliyev Sep 10 '12 at 17:10
    
Can you please elaborate ? I got stuck in the same problem. :( – Prasad Nov 12 '13 at 7:39

A simple way to run comands is by using Process object.

String[] commands = { "cd Desktop\nikto-2.1.4", "nikto.pl -h www.cirt.net -ssl ." }
Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec( commands );
try {
    InputStream is = process.getInputStream();
    try {
        //.... do something        
    } 
    finally { is.close(); }
}
finally { process.destroy(); }

Now handling all of these different streams can be messy, thus -> java.lang.ProcessBuilder suggested by Mr. Lawrey. It is a utility class provided by JVM intended to simplify usage of Process object. It would make given example more tolerable.

share|improve this answer

The following code will display the output of nikto.pl -h www.cirt.net -sslb, allowing you to capture and manipulate it.

cd Desktop\nikto-2.1.4
for /f "tokens=*" %%x in ('nikto.pl -h www.cirt.net -sslb') do echo %%x
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.