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What is the correct Hello World program in C?

Since the first page of Google results for "c hello world" vary greatly and many are old C, I would like the standard version in one place for easy copy and paste.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by bummi, Lorenzo Donati, Sascha, showdev, Mario Oct 17 '13 at 22:33

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

22  
Do a lot of hello world programming? –  Edwin Buck Sep 10 '12 at 17:04
    
All versions are correct pretty much! And you can pretty much include the whole C library to make a hello world, without a problem! This is not really a constructive question! Constructive would be the most efficient hello world program in C maybe? Or a version that gives a quick overview of syntax and needs (eg stdio.h inclusion, main return type etc.) A hello world is almost always correct as far as I know!!! –  EvilGoat Sep 10 '12 at 20:51
    
Any program whose sole function is to print hello world on your screen is correct. Already this question has elicited a good deal of polling... voting to close. –  Jean-François Corbett Sep 11 '12 at 7:48
    
There are some correctness issues raised by the question, for example some of the results in that Google search don't specify the return type of main (relying on implicit int). But I don't think the question is really phrased to draw those issues out: there's no "the correct" hello world; if the question is "what's wrong with this code?" then it should post and ask about specific code, not refer via Google search to all the code in the world; I doubt that SO is the place to curate a "hello world" for every language, at a rate of one question per language. –  Steve Jessop Sep 11 '12 at 11:55

10 Answers 10

Depends how lazy you are :)

#error Hello World
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1  
I learned something here. I am new to C so I was unaware that I can introduce my own errors. –  xandout Sep 23 '13 at 6:03
2  
This is, unfortunately, absolutely correct. –  rvighne Oct 13 '13 at 0:18
2  
No up or down vote, because sometimes awesome and terrible are the same. –  meawoppl Mar 4 '14 at 3:05
1  
Terribly awesome? –  Aesthete Mar 6 '14 at 1:44
1  
But this doesn't compile. Compiling != running. –  jameshfisher Jul 27 '14 at 12:11
up vote 23 down vote accepted

I believe this is a standard Hello World program in C:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
  printf("Hello World\n");
  return 0;
}
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1  
Should be puts("hello") or printf("%s","hello") –  Jan Turoň Sep 10 '12 at 23:51
1  
We have a winner! –  QED Mar 28 '13 at 16:04

In C99 or C2011, you could use these four lines of code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    puts("Hello World!");
}

Since C99 (but not C89) allows you to omit the return 0; at the end, it returns a deterministic status of 0 (success) to the calling environment. It doesn't have any unused arguments to the function. It has the prototype for puts() from the header. The output includes an appropriate line ending. I think it is kosher and essentially minimal.

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Official GNU Hello World can be found here: http://www.gnu.org/software/hello/

The GNU Hello program produces a familiar, friendly greeting. Yes, this is another implementation of the classic program that prints “Hello, world!” when you run it.

However, unlike the minimal version often seen, GNU Hello processes its argument list to modify its behavior, supports greetings in many languages, and so on. The primary purpose of GNU Hello is to demonstrate how to write other programs that do these things; it serves as a model for GNU coding standards and GNU maintainer practices.

GNU Hello is written in C. For implementations in other programming languages, notably including translation into other languages, please see the GNU Gettext distribution.

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1  
+1 Bahahahaha, that's awesome. Though I can appreciate the serious purpose it serves as a model + coding standards demo. –  therefromhere Sep 10 '12 at 20:26

There is more than one, and while Tor's answer is good, I prefer to always use an argc / argv main function.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  printf("Hello World\n");
  return 0;
}

In the rare, odd event that printf was being checked for failure, you might encounter

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>

extern int errno;
extern FILE *stdout;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  errno = 0;

  int err = printf("Hello World\n");

  if (err < 0) {
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
  }

  err = fflush(stdout);

  if (err < 0 || errno != 0) {
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
  } else {
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
  }
}

Like any C program, this has been modified far too many times in attempts to make it even less buggy. Special thanks to R.., dmp, and Scooter who really deserve more credit than I can give.

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1  
Your second version contains multiple bugs. printf returns the number of characters written, so your error test is wrong. More subtly, this kind of error-checking with stdio is unreliable. If you want to report errors, you need to fflush too. –  R.. Sep 10 '12 at 17:38
    
I always used argc/argv prototype for main, until I started using all warnings and now I have to use (void) in most cases to avoid being told argc/argv are unused. –  Scooter Sep 10 '12 at 19:51
    
@R.. Thanks for the pointers, I modified printf to only check for error (negative) conditions. I assumed that if stdio was unreliable, reporting errors via printf was unreliable too (and flushing it wouldn't help a bit). That's why the return code was used. –  Edwin Buck Sep 10 '12 at 20:10
2  
Don't return -1, return EXIT_FAILURE. –  dmp Sep 10 '12 at 20:12
1  
@dmp Right. Too much time on platforms where EXIT_FAILURE and -1 were the same. –  Edwin Buck Sep 10 '12 at 20:13
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  printf("Hello World\n");
  getchar();
  return 0;
}
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The "official" one would be the one in the first edition of "The C Programming Language" by Kernighan and Ritchie.

To wit:

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
    printf("hello, world\n");
}
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The version of the C language described in 1st ed. K&R C is no longer "correct", nor is it advisable to use it as a reference. –  Steve Jessop Sep 11 '12 at 12:02
1  
@SteveJessop -- Depends on what you consider "correct". It's certainly historic, in that it is the ORIGINAL "hello world". Would you tell Renoir one of his paintings wasn't "correct"? –  Hot Licks Sep 11 '12 at 12:11
1  
I would if he'd painted a street map of Paris, and someone asked for a "correct" street map of Paris on MapOverflow, and he gave them his from c. 1860. It would no longer be correct, and it would not be advisable to use it as a reference. Interestingly, Wikipedia mentions an earlier "hello world", also by Kernighan, written in B. That's not "correct C" either, but it's certainly historic. –  Steve Jessop Sep 11 '12 at 12:49
    
@SteveJessop Interesting, as this brings to mind my recent toying with temporal databases. Hot Licks and you are both correct, except temporally you are only interested in current, while Hot Licks is interested in past views of current knowledge. For hello world, it comes down to requirements, and the only real requirement on that program is that it display "Hello, world!". If you meet all the requirements, no matter how badly written the code, is it correct? –  Edwin Buck Sep 11 '12 at 14:00
1  
@SteveJessop -- But it should be noted that the "correct text" is "hello, world", not "Hello World" or "Hello world!" or whatever. –  Hot Licks Sep 11 '12 at 16:06

What do you mean by "correct"? ;)

I suppose that this one is the most correct, as it doesn't miss anything:

#include <stdio.h>

#ifndef HELLO_STRING
#define HELLO_STRING "Hello, world!"
#endif

int main(int argc, char *argv[], char *envp[])
{
    puts(HELLO_STRING);
    return 0;
}

However, this program is not localized, if you want localization, then use libintl ;)

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Good question ... what is correct ? versions with argc,argv,... could generate warnings as they are defined but not used. –  Kwariz Sep 10 '12 at 16:35
    
@Kwariz I tried it with gcc -Wall -Wunused, it didn't generate these warnings. Which compiler do you mean? –  Pupkov-Zadnij Sep 10 '12 at 16:42
1  
+1 for the comma in "Hello, world!". ISTR reading that the first-ever "hello world" program had that, so it's clearly more correct. –  Steve Jessop Sep 10 '12 at 16:48
    
@Pupkov-Zadnij well simply add -Wextra : gcc -Wall -Wextra ; I use gcc v4.7 ; but that was just to highlight that "correct" has no useful meaning (in my mind) when talking about The "hello world" source :) –  Kwariz Sep 10 '12 at 16:50
2  
Please don't use envp. Many implementations support more than two arguments to main, however, programs that define main with three arguments are not strictly conforming. –  dmp Sep 10 '12 at 20:18
$ cat hello.c
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("Hello world!\n");
}

$ c99 hello.c
$ ./a.out
Hello world!
$
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Although there is an implicit return of 0 in this case (guaranteed by C99) please consider doing so explicitly as it is highly idiomatic. –  dmp Sep 10 '12 at 21:12
1  
@dmp There are enough answers with an explicit "return 0". My intention was to say something different :p –  sigjuice Sep 10 '12 at 22:19

Then there's:

#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
  system("echo Hello World!");
  return 0;
}
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